Should I add two inches of insulation to my 2 X 4 frame exterior walls to save on heating costs?

My house is wrapped in Tyvex and 1 inch insulation board already.

8 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    1 inch isn't much of a barrier, and certainly as long as you're using cellular, construction, insulation foam, I suggest take it all the way to the interior face of the 2 x 4. In your case that would allow that a 2 inch thick sheet, cut appropriately would leave approximately 3/8 inch space behind any wall material you install.

    Without question it will add properties of efficiency.

    Without knowing. Is this new construction? A remodel? The entire structure? What is the substance of the exterior? beyond that you have Tyvek covering it.

    I suggest too, checking the attic/crawl spaces, if they exist, and have any insulation there at an R30 rating at least.

    I'd be OK following this, if you care to.

    Steven Wolf

    (The Rev.)

    Source(s): 40 plus years as a contractor
    • Login to reply the answers
  • Newt
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    If your walls are already finished, this would be difficult. and costly. if they are still open, about the maximum R value for the wall insulation between the studs is R15. Any more will eliminate the necessary air space that creates the barrier between the outside air and the inside air.

    The main source of heat loss is thru the windows. Be sure you have low E glass and that all gaps are sealed. If you are at the max R value for the walls, an attic blanket is the next best thing. Heat rises. The idea here is to contain that heat in the living area - not send it thru the attic. It also helps cool in the summer as the warm attic air cannot permiate into the living area.

    Source(s): The Mind of Newt
    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Do the ceiling first as that is where most of the heat loss would go as heat travels upward. And I agree with the windows as well. Home Depot had some neat windows that were vinyl and have eliminated the need for J channel around them. American Craftsman was the brandname, I believe. Check it out. They had a nailing flange and would be simple installation. Also if you do this, make sure you use the water barrier tape - about 4" wide and sticks on over the nailing flange.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    If you had the space, etc.. I would add insulation at ANY opportunity that I could

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Maggie
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Yes

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Any insulation you can add will benifit you later in savings, do it!

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Sure it would help save costs. I would not open up walls to do it.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Duke
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Why not ? go for it.

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.