where did the radio phrase 10-4 come from?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
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    "Ten-Four" is a frequently used ten-code acknowledgment that a transmission has been received and understood. A "big ten-f our" means the received message is agreed with by the recipient. It is difficult to find where it actually originated, but it is part of standard CB jargon.

    Ten-four "I understand, message received," is attested in popular jargon from 1962, from use in CB and police radio in the U.S. by 1950).

    Using such terms for radio communication help with clarity and ensuring messages are well understood, so it probably originated for that purpose.

    Here are the links I was able to find.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    There are 200 10-Codes in current usage, approximately 50 of these are used by the police, fire and other types of radio operators, while others have combined meanings depending on the service. Below is a list of the most commonly used 10-Codes:

    10-1 = Receiving poorly

    10-2 = Receiving well

    10-3 = Stop transmitting

    10-4 = Message received

    10-5 = Relay message to _____

    10-6 = Busy, please stand by

    10-7 = Out of service, leaving the air

    10-8 = In service, subject to call

    10-9 = Repeat message

    10-10 = Transmission completed, standing by

    10-11 = Talking too rapidly

    10-12 = Visitors present

    10-13 = Advise Weather/Road conditions

    10-16 = Make pick up at _____

    10-17 = Urgent business

    10-18 = Anything for us?

    10-19 = Nothing for you, return to base

    10-20 = My location is _____

    10-21 = Call by telephone

    10-22 = Report in person to

    10-23 = Stand by

    10-24 = Completed last assignment

    10-25 = Can you contact _____

    10-26 = Disregard last information

    10-27 = I am moving to channel _____

    10-28 = Identify your station

    10-29 = Time is up for contact

    10-30 = Does not conform to FCC rules

    10-32 = I will give you a radio check

    10-33 = Emergency Traffic

    10-34 = Trouble at this station

    10-35 = Confidential information

    10-36 = Correct time is

    10-37 = Wrecker needed at

    10-38 = Ambulance needed at

    10-39 = Your message delivered

    10-41 = Please turn to channel

    10-42 = Traffic accident at

    10-43 = Traffic tie up at

    10-44 = I have a message for you

    10-45 = All units within range please report

    10-50 = Break channel

    10-60 = What is next message number?

    10-62 = Unable to copy, use phone

    10-63 = Net directed to

    10-64 = Net clear

    10-65 = Awaiting your next message/assignment

    10-67 = All units comply

    10-70 = Fire at _____

    10-71 = Proceed with transmission in sequence

    10-77 = Negative contact

    10-81 = Reserve hotel room for ______

    10-82 = Reserve room for _____

    10-84 = My telephone number is ______

    10-85 = My address is _____

    10-91 = Talk closer to the microphone

    10-93 = Check my frequency on this channel

    10-94 = Please give me a long count (1-10)

    10-99 = Mission completed, all units secure

    10-200 = Police needed at _____

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  • 1 decade ago

    10-4 is one of the common CB ten codes. Explanation follows:

    What are Ten Codes?

    Ten Codes are abbreviations of common questions and answers used on all types of radio. Profession CB'ers use Ten Codes to send their message quickly and easily. Additionally, Ten Codes can be readily understood by stations which may be receiving you poorly or when a language barrier is present. Learning Ten Codes is most often done by their use. Copy this list of some of the most common Ten Codes and keep them near your radio. Use these Ten Codes in your daily communications and soon you will have most of them committed to memory!

    Common CB Radio Ten Codes

    10-1 = Receiving poorly

    10-2 = Receiving well

    10-3 = Stop transmitting

    10-4 = Message received

    10-5 = Relay message to _____

    10-6 = Busy, please stand by

    10-7 = Out of service, leaving the air

    10-8 = In service, subject to call

    10-9 = Repeat message

    10-10 = Transmission completed, standing by

    10-11 = Talking too rapidly

    10-12 = Visitors present

    10-13 = Advise Weather/Road conditions

    10-16 = Make pick up at _____

    10-17 = Urgent business

    10-18 = Anything for us?

    10-19 = Nothing for you, return to base

    10-20 = My location is _____

    10-21 = Call by telephone

    10-22 = Report in person to

    10-23 = Stand by

    10-24 = Completed last assignment

    10-25 = Can you contact _____

    10-26 = Disregard last information

    10-27 = I am moving to channel _____

    10-28 = Identify your station

    10-29 = Time is up for contact

    10-30 = Does not conform to FCC rules

    10-32 = I will give you a radio check

    10-33 = Emergency Traffic

    10-34 = Trouble at this station

    10-35 = Confidential information

    10-36 = Correct time is

    10-37 = Wrecker needed at

    10-38 = Ambulance needed at

    10-39 = Your message delivered

    10-41 = Please turn to channel

    10-42 = Traffic accident at

    10-43 = Traffic tie up at

    10-44 = I have a message for you

    10-45 = All units within range please report

    10-50 = Break channel

    10-60 = What is next message number?

    10-62 = Unable to copy, use phone

    10-63 = Net directed to

    10-64 = Net clear

    10-65 = Awaiting your next message/assignment

    10-67 = All units comply

    10-70 = Fire at _____

    10-71 = Proceed with transmission in sequence

    10-77 = Negative contact

    10-81 = Reserve hotel room for ______

    10-82 = Reserve room for _____

    10-84 = My telephone number is ______

    10-85 = My address is _____

    10-91 = Talk closer to the microphone

    10-93 = Check my frequency on this channel

    10-94 = Please give me a long count (1-10)

    10-99 = Mission completed, all units secure

    10-200 = Police needed at _____

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  • 1 decade ago

    It is part of the 10-codes, developed in 1937 and expanded in 1974 by the Association of Public Safety Communication Officials (APCO), allow for brevity and standardization of message traffic. They have historically been widely used by law enforcement officers in North America, although the trend is away from their use in recent years with more departments discouraging the use of ten-codes and encouraging "clear" or plain language communications.

    10-4 generally means understood or OK or affirmative.

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  • 1 decade ago

    A bunch of "10 codes" also known as "ten signals" made popular in the 70's by APCO ( Association of Public Safety Communication Officials).

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