J C asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 1 decade ago

PHYSICS: Are there any WAVES where the points above and below the MIDPOINT are not equal?

Are there any types of waves (sound, light, etc) that exist where the points above and below the mid point are not the same/equal inversely.

I was looking at a sound wave and wondered if it would be possible to have a wave with such characteristics. Thanks for your time...

5 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Taking 0 volts, 0 dB or whatever as the reference point, yes.

    For example, in an electronic circuit, you could clip all the positive wave excursions that exceed some threshold you set, leaving the negative ones alone.

    Another example is any waveform that shows an increase or decrease over time in the strength of the wave - ring a bell, and as the reverberations diminish, each successive excursion of the wave from rest/silence is slightly smaller than the preceding one.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Kes
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Yes! Water waves on the open sea (swells) may be uniform and sinusoidal. However when the wave reaches a (sloping?) shore, the wave form is distorted. Even at sea in a driving storm forming crests waves are distorted. Seismic waves traveling through layers of different earth crust (sand, rock, magma, etc.) should also become distorted. Waves formed by oscillations of non-uniform springs (leaf springs?) should be distorted. Look for distortions. Also look for interaction of waves (sound) causing reinforcement vs interference.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • averyl
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    think of of midpoints as averaging. in case you have been to devise a bunch of dots on a chart, you may upload all x values and divide with the aid of the style of dots to locate the x trouble-free (midpoint). Do the comparable subject with all y values. you have 2 x values, -3 and nil so upload them and divide with the aid of the style of dots equals... ... ...-3/2 and for y fee its 6/2 midpint of line is (-3/2,3)

    • Login to reply the answers
  • MikeY
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    definitely, try a waveform where you spend longer at -1 than +1 (and no time anywhere else) for example.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    isn't the word MIDpoint a give away? surely, in the situation you describe, that point would simply shift.

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.