Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 1 decade ago

turn the other cheek?

I've heard from some preachers that this was actually an insult in that day and age. Are they right?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Back then it was an Eye for an Eye, a Tooth for a Tooth.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No, I think they are perhaps trying to obscure the message for some reason.

    It's possible, however, that they are thinking about the social implications of a slap in biblical times, and getting a bit muddled up.

    It was seen as a mark of disrespect and disdain to slap a lower class person with the back of your hand. So the slap itself would be the insult. If the insulted person literally turned the other cheek, it would present their attacker with a problem. They couldn't use their other hand to slap with, as one hand was regarded as unclean in Jewish religion. So they would have to strike the other cheek with the palm of their hand, which would indicate equality with the person they were striking. So some people have interpreted it as a kind of passive resistance, and a demand for equality.

    It seems clear that Jesus did not intend the gesture as an insult, because the fuller quote (from the Sermon on the Mount) is "Bless them that curse you, and pray for them which despitefully use you. And unto him that smiteth thee on the one cheek offer also the other; and him that taketh away thy cloak forbid not to take thy coat also." (Luke 6:28-31)

    This is clearly a message of forgiveness rather than insult.

  • 1 decade ago

    That phrase is referring to someone slapping you in the face...if they do, offer them your other cheek to slap as well. A slap in the face is still an insult today. If you're referring to turning your other cheek as being the insult, technically it would be somewhat of an insult in that it could potentially make the one slapping you feel that you've got a "holier than thou" attitude.

  • 1 decade ago

    >turn the other cheek?

    I've heard from some preachers that this was actually an insult in that day and age. Are they right?

    In Jesus' time, to publicly insult someone was to slap them on one certain cheek (I can't remember if it was right or left).

    If you turned your cheek instead of hitting them back, to hit you again they would have to hit the "wrong" cheek and degrade themselves in the process.

    It's a classic example of nonviolent resistance.

    ~ Lib

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes and it is still an insult. But what do you do when you run out of cheeks to slap? How many times do you allow someone to do that to you? Just wondering.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    depends on religion and national origins, in china a chalange was just that and to walk away from it usualy ment a deat of that person or a major disohner. the romans however are in that time piriod and were without this code of ethics or houner and just took it as an insult becuse they felt denied the fight they thot they ither deserved or asked for.

  • 1 decade ago

    I dont like to turn the other cheek never know when the other one will get slapped

  • 1 decade ago

    not so much an insult as a challenge ,you ever try to fight a guy that wont fight back ? it leaves him with the emotional load on his shoulders

    ( unfortunately with my mongrel bred Irish/viking Gaul temper even i still struggle with it , it really takes the lord in your life to pull it off)

    blessings to you

  • The preachers are,as usual, ignorant of their own subject.

  • 1 decade ago

    some biblical scholars say 'yes' to your querry....because you are offering the 'offense' again. But remember who the bible was written for. I think I'll ask that quesiton....

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