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Raising kids for 2yrs. I want to go back to work, What do i say on my resume with the blank space between jobs

ive been home for 2 yrs, now im ready to return to work, but my resume needs updating, what should i write in the space between my last job (2 yrs ago) and now?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    On my resume I left that blank. On any interviews I"m very up front and smiling when I tell the interviewer I took time off for my family and am ready to enter the work force again, giving as much dedication to an employer as I have to my family for the past two years. I don't apologize for what I did at all. It of course makes me a better person, I believe.

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  • 1 decade ago

    tell the truth. You are not the only person who ever took a break to raise kids. I was out of work 3 and a half years. You don't owe an explination unless they ask for one. If you feel something needs to be put there, then list something like "temporary break in employment due to children" then list the years this occurred. But remember, plenty of skills are required to raise children so don't sell yourself short. After two years at home, your multitasking and problem solving skills have greatly improved. You are also great with event planning and food preparation. So, be sure to include these attributes in your resume as well. Don't hesitate to use the time at home with your children to your advantage. If you were involved in the PTO or any other activities with your children were you were in a leadership role, then list that as well.

    Still, alot of people have breaks in work so that won't automatically disqualify you for the job. If you are called in for an interview and a question arises about the break between jobs then let them know that you took time off to focus on your children for a few years.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Gaps in a resume are red flags for both first level Human resoources personnel and the pointy headed boss in the corner office.

    The good news is it is ALSO a chance to really shine. Key is honesty, and really LOOK at what you have been doing during the gap.

    You mention raising children. Have you done ANYTHING else? Volunteer work? Church Work? Neighborhood Association? You often overlook "worklike activities", volunteers often have to staff booths, talk to the public, stuff envelopes, design webpages, answer telephones, help build things (Habitat?), and the like.

    Did you... train a dog? (shows ability to lead and direct, works best when the dog does well) Did you write letters to public officials (shows aptitude in government relations and/or public relations) Did you answer product surveys? You get the idea.

    If you really haven't done anything but raise children (not to belittle this) then make a clean sweep; "I have devoted the last two years to raising my children, now that I have completed that responsibility to a point where I feel comfortable in being able to add gainful employment, I wish to take that step .... AND INSERT DETAILS ON WHAT VALUE YOU CAN ADD TO THE ORGANIZATION YOU ARE INTERVIEWING FOR. Here you can get details aboout the folks you are applying with, at least you show interest in how and what the folks you are interviewing with DO... and most interviewees DO NOT DO THIS TYPE OF RESEARCH. It will make you stand out... and probably help you get your feet wet (again).

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  • Judy
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    I wouldn't put anything on the resume about that time. If they ask in an interview (and they probably will) just tell them you took time out to give your kids a start, and that now you're ready to go back to work. If they have a problem with that, then you probably don't want to work for them anyway. Most people won't be surprised at your answer, or think it's strange at all.

    My opinion is that a successful mom uses many of the most important skills that most jobs require - they must be organized, able to set priorities and deal with shifting priorities, and must deal with people and crises.

    Good luck.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Hi! Hope this will help. Just tell the truth, add an "Additional Information" paragraph at the end of your resume. In your own words, just say that you were a "stay at home parent" for 2 years. You were involved with other stay at home parents, maybe preschool volunteering, children's play group stuff, etc. (It's the most trying and rewarding job!). Trust me, you'll get called in for interviews and you'll get employed! Good luck and Happy New Year!

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  • 1 decade ago

    It is unfortunate, but when you have gaps the assumption is that your not keeping up with industry growth. You may not get the interview with current large gaps. Don't leave any gaps if you can help it. Think of the things you have been doing during that time. Have you organized any outings, group trips, fund raisers, ect...? Worked on any political campaigns? Sold Avon, made business cards for friends or family? Do you have any hobbies that require any skill? Have you been keeping up with any trade journals or industry info? Brian storm on some of the things you've done and put a label on it. But, don't lie.... it's not worth it.

    Source(s): I was off work 2 yrs from Human Resources because of an injury and got a job in HR training. It took awhile. Two angencies told me they could not place me without having "current experience". During my time off I made bus. cards, helped people with software and assisted people with job searches. I added this info to my resume, registered with an agency and got a job in less than a month.
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  • 1 decade ago

    You don't need to add information to your resume, put it in your cover letter.

    When you are interviewing, it is a great way to set up your skills...you can say something like "You'll notive that there is a gap in my employment. This is because I was raising my children. While doing that, I also...." and add in everything that goes into raising a kid...sunday school teacher, ECFE coordinator, etc.

    Good Luck!

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  • 1 decade ago

    I work for an employment agency and help people with resumes everyday. Just list your employment history for the past 10 years. If asked to an interview, if they're any good they'll ask you about the gap in employment at that time. Just be honest...no one penalizes for taking time off for family. And just a side note....don't list anything about your personal life (like hobbies) on your resume...employers don't look at it and it's just fluff to take up space.

    Source(s): It's my job!
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  • 1 decade ago

    You are under no obligation to explain the blank space. If the interviewers want to know, they can ask. If they do, tell the truth. Raising kids is not a shameful period of your life. If pressed on it, tell them that raising kids has helped you hone professional skills such as multitasking, time mangagment, budgeting, discipline and other people skills.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I would put on your resume that you are a homemaker. Because you are at home but you are taking care of your kids and cleaning and cooking and teaching and stuff like that. That is basically what a homemaker is.

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