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Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 1 decade ago

Is soap kosher?

I know you don't consume it but does soap (which I'm fairly certain a majority of is made from rendered pig fat) have to be kosher and is it considered kosher?

Update:

I apologise, it's rendered beef fat that's used.

Someone mentioned glycerol soap I think. In most soaps the glycerol is removed during some sort of purifying process.

Also, soaps derived from vegetable fats are called castile soap apparently.

15 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    To answer your question...yes, some soaps are kosher. However, if it contains any animal by-products it is not kosher.

    ...=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-----

    Misconception:There is no valid reason to use kosher soap.

    Fact:There is a solid halachic basis for using kosher soap exclusively.

    People often fail to consider what a marvelous substance soap is – when used with water, it loosens unwanted particles, emulsifies grease and absorbs dirt into foam. Its efficacy is usually due to a chemical reaction between an acid and a base. Typically, the acid derives from either vegetable or animal fat. Historically, most soaps were made from animal fats1. Even today, excluding “vegetarian” soap, most soaps are made from animal fat. For example, Ivory soap2 (advertised as “99 44/100% pure” ) is, according to its web site, “made of both vegetable oils and animal fats”. In response to my telephone inquiry, the Procter & Gamble spokesman stated that the animal fats in Ivory are the usually discarded tallow of beef and pork. In addition, animal fats are the main ingredients in Ivory, making up over fifty percent of the product.

    You can purchase Kosher Soap on this site...

    http://www.wonderful.myarbonne.com/arbonne/wonderf...

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  • zalman
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Kosher Soap

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes, soap has to be kosher because it is used on dishes, leaves a residue, and is used with hot water, which would, under kosher law, cook its taste into the dishes. (Any one of these reason would meen it needed to be kosher.)

    Most soap today is kosher as it is made from vegetable and chemical ingredients. There are lists. The problem is around the holiday of Passover kosher laws get more complicated because grains can't be used, and some soaps have grain based starches. There are rules for that too, and lists of which soaps meet the requirements.

    A soap made from fat could not be used on dishes, but if it came from pig and not beef fat it could be used for cleaning floors or something. Pig fat is not a problem for non-culinary use because it's not forbidden to benefit from it, only to eat it. Cow fat is holy to the L-rd, unless marbled with meat, so can't be used like that or eaten. It has to be destroyed.

    And nothing needs to be blessed to be kosher. It's kosher or its not. Blessing something's not gonna do it any good in that regard.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Kosher laws are mostly dietary in nature. Most people I would say follow them in regards to what they ingest.

    However in Israel and available for sale and shipment in the US is the Star of David soap(body soap, which the type of soap I assume you are talking about) which is Kosher and made with only natural oils. My thought is that is probably only popularly used among the Hasdic and most Orthodox Jews.

    Also for the people above of course animals will feel pain even in a Kosher death. their throats are slit and the blood is let out. But no matter how you kill a non kosher species animal it will never be Kosher so even if a pig was killed and blessed according to ritual it will still be unkosher.

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Is soap kosher?

    I know you don't consume it but does soap (which I'm fairly certain a majority of is made from rendered pig fat) have to be kosher and is it considered kosher?

    Source(s): soap kosher: https://tr.im/CDWyB
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  • Shossi
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Not all soap is Kosher. But, you can buy Kosher soap, if it is an issue with you. Just look up Kosher Soap on the NET.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I'd think kosher doesn't apply to soap. Kosher can only apply to food or drink. And why do you think that majority of soap made from pig's fat? I don't think that's true.

    Here's what soap is:

    Oils and fats for soap are compounds of glycerin and a fatty acid. When oils are mixed with an alkali, they form glycerin and the sodium salt of the fatty acid. The fatty acids required for soap making are supplied by tallow, grease, fish oils, and vegetable oils. The hardness, lathering qualities, and transparency of soap vary according to the combinations of fats and alkalis used as ingredients. An experienced soap crafter uses many combinations of oils.

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  • 1 decade ago

    If the animal experienced no pain when killed for the pig fat to make the soap then it would be considered kosher. But there are probably few kohser soaps out there.

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    In the superstore, fruits are usually selected much too soon. Some are rocks, many are bad. Some of the fresh vegetables are generally right (zucchini, onions, garlic, lettuce, greens, and a few others) so I'd have to go with vegetables.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Does it matter? Will you not be as clean if it is not kosher? This religion crap is just plain silly.

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