promotion image of download ymail app
Promoted
tcc asked in Home & GardenDo It Yourself (DIY) · 1 decade ago

I need to build a very basic miter saw stand. I need some help. I'm just starting to work with wood. Thanks

9 Answers

Relevance
  • Bill G
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I just built one myself using 2x4's and a 3/4" top. I turned the saw at a slight angle so a piece of wood would project into the room and not down the wall where it would run into other tools, etc. The construction is quite simple and cheap. If you are interested, email me and I'll send a few photos. I made the table somewhat heavy and sturdy and I can use the area under it to store wood and scraps. It's nothing more than a 2x4 frame with a plywood top.

    As you are just getting started, I'd suggest you consider this bench because your investment in it is minimal. Later, if you decide to get a professional table such as one you can find on Norm Abrams site (newyankee.com), you can use this table as a work bench somewhere.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Yeah, build one yourself. I build a new one for my big 12" DeWalt. I used 1/2 plywood and 1x frame, but I wish I had used 3/4". It is two boxes basically. Pretty simple. The bottom of the boxes are 8' and the top and frames are shorter to set the saw in between. I use three saw horses, one on each end and one in the middle. Then I screw a piece of plywood down to join the boxes together. Then the saw goes in. The base of the saw is set at the same height as the top of the boxes. It was a simple one. But you can make them more complicated with fences that line up with the fence of the saw, even run an receptacle so you plug the stand in, or build drawers in the boxes. Of course, all that makes it heavier. It is just a portable one make it simple, because it is going to get banged up and it will be lighter. But if this a stationary one for the workshop, have some fun with it. Think about what storage you need, fences with build in stop, electric.

    Good Luck

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Depends on if you want to be stationary or mobile. Me, I`m mobile. Sometimes I may have 4 or 5 jobsites a day. I always get comments on my electric table. Ever seen one of those 5 or 6 ft long tables with the folding legs and metal apron around the edge? The ones with the crappy particle board tops. Well I resurrected one. Took all the metal parts and installed them on a salvaged piece of 5/8 plywood. On the front of the apron, I installed one of those old metal electric strips. I can plug in 8 tools at one table. You`d be suprised how much time you save by not having to constantly plug and unplug a bunch of different tools. Sadly though, after 8 yrs and about 4 or 5 diferent tops, the welds on the legs are starting to fail. Don`t know if I`m going to reweld them or just scrounge another. Probably reweld, she`s been pretty faithful!!

    Source(s): 15 yrs doors and windows
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    If you just want something for just the miter saw, I would check the thrift stores or yard sales or freecycle or craigslist for an old ugly, cheap table and bolt the miter saw to the top.

    If you want something with arms that will support your work then you could also buy some rollers and attach them to a bench at the right height or buy cheap roller stands from someplace like harbor freight tools

    good luck and welcome to the world of woodworking

    wear safety glasses, sawdust in the eyes sucks!

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    My husband is a carpenter by trade and had built from scratch countless saw tables over the years, each one built specifically for some new project. One day when I was in Sam's Club, I discovered a folding, plastic, rectangular table in the office supplies section. It was terribly lightweight and folded completely flat with a handle for ease of carrying. When I brought it home to him he discovered that the legs even extended to a height greater than the average dinner table which made it absolutely perfect for his saw. The best part is that it takes up next to no space when not in use or when thrown in the back of a pick-up truck. It is considerably less heavy than his old wooden ones. Needless to say, all the old ones have disappeared because he loves his new one!

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Joel A
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    If you want to do it the easy way, just go buy one. Home Depot sells an excellant and affordable miter saw stand made by Ryobi for about $100. I bought it instead of the DeWalt one to go with my DeWalt saw. Very portable, sturdy and useful. Good Luck.

    Source(s): Custom Design, Build & Renovator for 26 years.
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 4 years ago

    If you are planning to start on your woodworking project, this isn't something you should use, it's something that you would be insane not to. Go here https://tr.im/pDvtn

    Truth is, I've been a carpenter for almost 36 years, and I haven't found anything like this for less than 10's of thousands of dollars.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    building on will be time consuming and cost money, money that could be spent to buy one. You need a longer table that just one to hold the saw. This is because when you are cutting boards longer than the table on the saw, you will have to hold it down. Mine extends about 6' in each direction from the saw.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Want you like to get instant access to over 16,000 woodworking plans?

    Check it out https://tr.im/4f401

    Along with stone, mud and animal parts, wood was one of the first materials worked by early humans. Microwear analysis of the Mousterian stone tools used by the Neanderthals show that many were used to work wood. The development of civilization was closely tied to the development of increasingly greater degrees of skill in working these materials.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.