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For all non-christians... what do you think about the documentary, "The God Who Wasn't There?"?

Do you think Robert Price and crew left anything out?

Do you agree or disagree with their findings?

http://www.thegodmovie.com/

Update:

Tigger, did you see the movie or at least go to the site? Before assuming I'm trying to convert you, perhaps you should check it out.. enjoy your 2pts.

Update 2:

GA, I've read your bible over 50 times cover to cover.. thanks for showing us all what Christianity is about ;)

5 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I watched the trailer and would love to see this movie. However, all the screenings in my area are over. I am a fan of Richard Dawkins and have spent some time researching the historicity of the bible. I will be looking for any future opportunities to see this movie. Thank you bringing it to my attention and may you be touched by his noodly appendage today and always!

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  • ?
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    I'll let you know what I think of it once I see the whole movie. The trailer sold me on wanting to see it. As I watch it, I'm sure that I will probably agree with almost everything it will have to say, as it is what I already suspect is true. No one likes having their faith attacked, so it is only natural that those who are believers already will find countless ways to attack and discredit it, those such as myself will see it's virtues. However, I don't want to fall into the same kind of unquestioning faith in a movie like that which religion itself promotes, so it will be great as food for thought and topics to explore as I continue to search for truth that I can have trust in. "Faith in things unseen" has no place in forming a rational and enlightened opnion on reality, but true objectivity is often difficult to achieve, even when one is completely aware of that fact.

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  • ?
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    I don't believe in God

    prove to me that God exists

    and I still won't believe

    I'm not saying you're trying to convert me, I'm just saying that no matter what the movie says I will not give up my principles

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  • 1 decade ago

    Sounds like a good movie.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    After viewing Brian Flemming’s The God Who Wasn’t There, I fear that the greatest temptation for most Christians might be a similarly impassioned retort mirroring Flemming’s own splintered acerbities. For just as Flemming’s contrived criticism of orthodox Christianity sputters under its own weight of bitter and bloated self-importance, so also would a Christian response in a similar vein hardly rise above the vengeful level of its antagonist. I make this point with such certainty because two key factors emerge with clarity: (1) The fact that Flemming is merely harassing us with a slick presentation of platitudes from the underdeveloped secularist worldview that duped him and (2) The fact that contemporary evangelical Christianity is insistent upon lowering itself to adopt the tactics of its opponents, albeit with much less success (typically).

    These two factors should prevent us from taking Flemming too seriously, and likewise taking ourselves too seriously, as if we were somehow obligated to “out-argue” him. TGWWT is indeed little more than a sound-byte-driven aggravation. Can a few slanted interviews with “experts” of dubious reputations or several contrived street interactions with unsuspecting people shake the foundations of Christian history and belief? I think not. Nor should his affective style cause the Christian any concern. The reality that it might probably indicates that the faith of too many Christians is undergirded with similar fragility, which is deeply disconcerting. Instead, Christians must firmly ground themselves with the consciousness of being the bearers of a unique community and story. Each one of us is a little light reflecting the radiance of a much larger holy sun. Responding to our detractors is not a game we play to test our tactics, but the channeling of the light of Christ into the unbelieving world of darkness. Thus, for us to use a similar “sound-byte” strategy would be tantamount to saying that the Christian apology is predicated on our own cleverness. How much could we pack into a rejoinder of similar length and depth? If that is our attitude, then a vicious cycle of trivialities and self-comfort begins. But that’s what people like Brian Flemming want, isn’t it? For the determined atheist, that’s all he has. The atheist in this so-called “post-Christian” society must spend the bulk of his energies convincing himself that his own manufactured story is somehow better than the one from which he is trying to free himself. The Christian should find himself in no such predicament. We don’t have to forge our own kingdom and justify it by our own efforts. We have the witness of the Scriptures, the saints and the Catholic Church of which we are all members. The sound-byte atheist apologetics of TGWWT is but the doomed effort of a fragmented people who try to unite themselves with what they reject. That is why I accused their system of being underdeveloped. By comparison, modern atheism is immature, and its American incarnation is pathetically trapped in the breathlessly-paced technology world of its own misguided creation. Christians should not feel imprisoned by the secularist desire to be quick, artificial and easy, for we are in no hurry to validate ourselves. Our process of becoming is controlled by the divine plan, not man’s attempt at autonomy.

    But how do we be what we must within a society that would seek to reduce us, as they have reduced themselves, to a media-based worldview? Two suggestions: (1) We cannot avoid having our lives and words manipulated. As long as the world seeks to misrepresent Christ and his Church, they will find ways to do it and be darn good at it. We shouldn’t be surprised or offended if the world simply acts like the world. (2) Avoid making their methods our own. I am certainly not saying that we can’t redeem modern media for our own purposes, but, as I have stressed throughout, Christianity is more than we can live or prove with a few blurbs, graphics and grooves. Instead of going to them with an argument, make them come to us. The best “response” to secularists will always be the Church itself: our lives, our worship and our love for one another. Isn’t that the New Testament picture of the kingdom?

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