Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Food & DrinkEthnic Cuisine · 1 decade ago

who has a recipe for haggis?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Haggis "is typically served on Burns Night, January 25, when Scotland celebrates the birth of its greatest poet, Robert Burns, who was born in Ayrshire on that date in 1759. During the celebration, Burns poems are read, and the haggis is addressed by a member of the party, ceremonially, in the form of verses from Burns' poem, 'Address to a Haggis.' A typical meal for Burns Night would include Cock-a-Leekie, Haggis with Tatties-an'-Neeps, Roastit Beef, Tipsy Laird, and Dunlop Cheese."

    Traditional Haggis

    1 sheep's pluck (stomach bag)

    2 lb.. dry oatmeal

    1 lb. suet

    1 lb. lamb's liver

    2 1/2 cups stock

    1 large chopped onion

    1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper, Jamaica pepper and salt

    Boil liver and parboil the onion, then mince them together. Lightly brown the oatmeal. Mix all ingredients together. Fill the sheep's pluck with the mixture pressing it down to remove all the air, and sew up securely. Prick the haggis in several places so that it does not burst. Place haggis in boiling water and boil slowly for 4-5 hours. Serves approximately 12.

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    Lady Login's Receipt, 1856

    1 cleaned sheep or lamb's stomach bag

    2 lb. dry oatmeal

    1 lb chopped mutton suet

    1 lb lamb's or deer's liver, boiled and minced

    1 pint (2 cups) stock

    the heart and lights of the sheep, boiled and minced

    1 large chopped onion

    1/2 tsp.. each: cayenne pepper, Jamaica pepper, salt and pepper

    Toast the oatmeal slowly until it is crisp, then mix all the ingredients (except the stomach bag) together, and add the stock. Fill the bag just over half full, press out the air and sew up securely. Have ready a large pot of boiling water, prick the haggis all over with a large needle so it does not burst and boil slowly for 4 to 5 hours. Serves 12.

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    A Detailed Haggis Recipe :

    1 sheep's stomach, thoroughly cleaned

    The liver, heart, and lights (lungs) of the sheep

    1 lb Beef suet

    2 large Onions

    2 tb Salt

    1 ts Freshly ground black pepper

    1/2 ts Cayenne or red pepper

    1/2 ts Allspice

    2 lb Dry oatmeal (the old-fashioned, slow-cooking kind)

    2-3 cups broth (in which the liver, heart and lights were cooked)

    What you need: Canning kettle or a large spaghetti pot, 16- to 20 quart size with a lid to fit it; meat grinder; cheesecloth

    What to do: If the butcher has not already cut apart and trimmed the heart, liver and lungs, do that first. It involves cutting the lungs off the windpipe, cutting the heart off the large blood vessels and cutting it open to rinse it, so that it can cook more quickly. The liver, too, has to be freed from the rest. Put them in a 4-quart pot with 2 to 3 cups water, bring to a boil, and simmer for about an hour and a half. Let it all cool, and keep the broth.

    Run the liver and heart through the meat grinder. Take the lungs and cut out as much of the gristly part as you easily can, then run them through the grinder, too. Next, put the raw beef suet through the grinder. As you finish grinding each thing, put it in the big kettle. Peel, slice and chop the onions, then add them to the meat in the kettle. Add the salt and spices and mix.

    The oatmeal comes next, and while it is customary to toast it or brown it very lightly in the oven or in a heavy bottomed pan on top of the stove, this is not absolutely necessary. When the oatmeal has been thoroughly mixed with the rest of it, add the 2 cups of the broth left from boiling the meat. See if when you take a handful, it sticks together. If it does, do not add the third cup of broth. If it is still crumbly and will not hold together very well, add the rest of the broth and mix thoroughly. Have the stomach smooth side out and stuff it with the mixture, about three-quarters full. Sew up the openings. Wrap it in cheesecloth, so that when it is cooked you can handle it.

    Now, wash out the kettle and bring about 2 gallons of water to a boil in it. Put in the haggis and prick it all over with a skewer so that it does not burst. You will want to do this a couple of times early in the cooking span. Boil the haggis gently for about 4 or 5 hours. If you did not have any cheesecloth for wrapping the haggis, you can use a large clean dishtowel. Work it under with kitchen spoons to make a sling with which you can lift out the haggis in one piece. You will probably want to wear lined rubber gloves to protect your hands from the hot water while you lift it out with the wet cloth. (You put the dish cloth in the pot only after the haggis is done; you do not cook the towel with the haggis as you would the cheesecloth.)

    Note: Even if the butcher has cleaned the stomach, you will probably want to go over it again. Turn the stomach shaggy side out and rinse. Rub it in a sinkful of cold water. Change the water and repeat as many times as necessary, until the water stays pretty clear and handling it does not produce much sediment as the water drains out of the sink.

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    Quick Haggis :

    1/2 lb liver

    1 onion

    1/2 cup oatmeal

    5 to 8 cups stock

    1/2 cup suet

    1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper

    1/2 tsp. salt

    Boil the liver and parboil the onion, then mince them together. Lightly brown the oatmeal then mix all ingredients together. Place in a greased basin and cover with foil, or a suet crust if desired and steam for 1 1/2 hours. Serves 4.

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    Americanized Haggis :

    1 lb boneless lamb shoulder or breast, cut into pieces (or ground lamb)

    1/2 lb lamb liver, cut into pieces

    1/2 c water

    1 small onion, coarsely chopped

    1 large egg

    3/4 ts salt

    3/4 ts pepper, black

    1/2 ts sugar

    1/4 ts ginger, ground

    1/8 ts cloves, ground

    1/8 ts nutmeg, ground

    1 c oats, rolled, old fashioned

    Heat oven to 350-F. Grease an 8 1/2 by 4 1/2 inch loaf pan.

    In food processor with chopping blade, process together half of the lamb, the liver, water, onion, egg, salt, pepper, sugar, ginger, cloves, and nutmeg until well combined. Add the remaining half of the lamb and the oats; process until well combined.

    Spoon lamb mixture into the greased pan; pat surface to level. Bake 45 to 55 minutes or until center feels firm when gently pressed. Cool 5 minutes in pan; unmold onto platter; slice and serve.

    Notes: This skinless haggis is planned for American tastes, yet contains many of the ingredients found in the real thing. You can unmold the loaf and serve it in place of the purchased haggis recipes.

  • Bliss
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Here is a traditional one:

    Lady Login's Receipt, 1856

    1 cleaned sheep or lamb's stomach bag

    2 lb. dry oatmeal

    1 lb chopped mutton suet

    1 lb lamb's or deer's liver, boiled and minced

    1 pint (2 cups) stock

    the heart and lights of the sheep, boiled and minced

    1 large chopped onion

    1/2 tsp.. each: cayenne pepper, Jamaica pepper, salt and pepper

    Toast the oatmeal slowly until it is crisp, then mix all the ingredients (except the stomach bag) together, and add the stock. Fill the bag just over half full, press out the air and sew up securely. Have ready a large pot of boiling water, prick the haggis all over with a large needle so it does not burst and boil slowly for 4 to 5 hours. Serves 12.

    And a modern haggis:

    Americanized Haggis (from Country Living, March 1991)

    1 lb boneless lamb shoulder or breast, cut into pieces (or ground lamb)

    1/2 lb lamb liver, cut into pieces

    1/2 c water

    1 small onion, coarsely chopped

    1 large egg

    3/4 ts salt

    3/4 ts pepper, black

    1/2 ts sugar

    1/4 ts ginger, ground

    1/8 ts cloves, ground

    1/8 ts nutmeg, ground

    1 c oats, rolled, old fashioned

    Heat oven to 350-F. Grease an 8 1/2 by 4 1/2 inch loaf pan.

    In food processor with chopping blade, process together half of the lamb, the liver, water, onion, egg, salt, pepper, sugar, ginger, cloves, and nutmeg until well combined. Add the remaining half of the lamb and the oats; process until well combined.

    Spoon lamb mixture into the greased pan; pat surface to level. Bake 45 to 55 minutes or until center feels firm when gently pressed. Cool 5 minutes in pan; unmold onto platter; slice and serve.

    Notes: This skinless haggis is planned for American tastes, yet contains many of the ingredients found in the real thing. You can unmold the loaf and serve it in place of the purchased haggis recipes.

    Go with God -- if evil had a smell, it would smell like haggis.

  • 1 decade ago

    I found one.

    Traditional Haggis (from Evelyn Hlabse, esh2@po.CWRU.Edu)

    1 sheep's pluck (stomach bag)

    2 lb.. dry oatmeal

    1 lb. suet

    1 lb. lamb's liver

    2 1/2 cups stock

    1 large chopped onion

    1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper, Jamaica pepper and salt

    Boil liver and parboil the onion, then mince them together. Lightly brown the oatmeal. Mix all ingredients together. Fill the sheep's pluck with the mixture pressing it down to remove all the air, and sew up securely. Prick the haggis in several places so that it does not burst. Place haggis in boiling water and boil slowly for 4-5 hours. Serves approximately 12.

    It's best served up on January 25th in Honor of Robert Burns the poet's birthday. :)

    Since my side of the family is predominately Scottish, Hold yer whist!

    And enjoy. :)

    LOL! My poor Aussie husband braves the pipes and the haggis when we have our big parties.

    Source(s): Scottish parties are called "Kay-Lees" but it's spelled Ceilidh.
  • 1 decade ago

    Alton Brown of Good Eats (FoodNetwork.com) has such a recipe. Not for the timid or weak of stomach.

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