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Depleted Uranium Weapons are being used today - Worth it to you?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    the history of our government since WWII is full of stories like this, from dropping Agent Orange on our own troops in Vietnam all the way to sickening our troops in Iraq with depleted Uranium. God knows what all we have done to the civilians in those countries. We have had and still do now some very sick minds making decisions in Washington. To rid ourselves of this kind of mental illness we would need to do some major excavation throughout. Will it never end?

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  • 3 years ago

    that is not a chemical weapon, because of the fact that is not a chemical. Uranium is an factor, like copper or brass, different than that is totally heavy. it is so heavy that maximum occurrences of it are what's called radioactive, the molecules are below a brilliant form of tension to eject textile (radioactive debris) that could injury havoc on organic and organic textile. Depleted uranium, because of the fact the call shows, is uranium this is or is oftentimes no longer radioactive. it would be innocuous adequate for intake in case you so wanted. that may no longer unavoidably constantly the case in case you recognize the complexities of radioactive supplies, yet in maximum situations it somewhat is risk-free to be around. known enriched uranium, or maybe the stuff chanced on in the wild, could in maximum situations provide you such severe radiation poisoning that it is not going you're able to survive.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Depleted Uranium?? What part of depleted do you not understand...? and it is NOT radioactive. This is just more anti war liberal media hype. Mattel Toys used a depleted Uranium counterweight (it is extremely heavy) in it's old walking dolls... California Sunset Pottery used Uranium oxide in the red color pigment for their dinner plates... Oh no. You want to borrow trouble? How about the estimated 12 billion tons of raw uranium ore existing world wide in shallow deposits, occurring naturally, and it IS radioactive... and it IS blowing dust all over... Wooo... NOW what you gonna do?

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  • 1 decade ago

    yea, look on the DoD website, they basically say tell new recruits that DU is no big deal and harmless if exposed.

    totally freakin nutso

    they used TONS of it in the Balkan Wars..Israel rained it down on Lebanon, not to mention it's use in Iraq.

    that stuff has a half life of like 500,000 years or more....

    pretty crazy though that even a 50 caliber machine gun can be turned into a tank killer if it's using DU shells.

    they also sandwich it between the steel plates of tanks now......so the tank crew is constantly being exposed.

    when it DU ammo hits anything it turns tends to create a LOT of airborne particles that blow for thousands of miles.

    it's said that Britain reported high levels of air-borne radioactive pollution during the balkan wars.....it blew that far

    i knew a guy who worked in the National Guard who's job was to load up destroyed Iraqi tanks onto flatbeds.....they didn't tell them about the massive DU contamination from the A-10 Warthogs ammo.....he lost all his teeth and his health went to pot.

    Source(s): lots of reading
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  • 1 decade ago

    Any time a human life is lost without first having the opportunity at negotiation is a tragedy . The use of weapons that harm our troops as well as leave behind deadly elements among the population attacked or liberated is immoral .

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  • 1 decade ago

    They've been used for decades. That's what our M1 Abrams fires.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Whatever gets the job done!

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