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what is Bermuda Triangle?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
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    "The Bermuda Triangle, also known as the Devil's Triangle, is a geographical area in the Atlantic Ocean famous for its supposed paranormal activities. It is roughly an equilateral triangular shape with its three corners located near the islands of Bermuda, Puerto Rico (near its capital city San Juan), and Miami, Florida, encompassing an area of nearly half a million square miles (1.2 million km²).

    There are many claims of paranormal activity within the triangle, especially the unexplained disappearance of ships and aircraft, or of their crews. Other common claims made of the region are that the laws of physics do not apply there as they do elsewhere, or that extraterrestrial beings are responsible for the disappearances."

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  • 1 decade ago

    The Bermuda Triangle, also known as the Devil's Triangle, is a geographical area in the Atlantic Ocean famous for its supposed paranormal activities. It is roughly an equilateral triangular shape with its three corners located near the islands of Bermuda, Puerto Rico (near its capital city San Juan), and Miami, Florida, encompassing an area of nearly half a million square miles (1.2 million km²).

    There are many claims of paranormal activity within the triangle, especially the unexplained disappearance of ships and aircraft, or of their crews. Other common claims made of the region are that the laws of physics do not apply there as they do elsewhere, or that extraterrestrial beings are responsible for the disappearances.

    Although there are many opinions on exactly what area is covered, it is usually considered to be the triangular area already mentioned. Other shapes have been suggested, including more of a "trapezium" covering an area extending back into the Gulf of Mexico and down into the Caribbean Sea, or in fact no dimensions at all, or a shape incorporating all of the northwestern Atlantic Ocean.

    To take advantage of prevailing winds, ships returning to Europe during the Age of Sail would sail north to the Carolinas before turning east to cross the north Atlantic. This pattern continued after the development of steam and internal combustion engines, meaning that much of the north Atlantic shipping traffic crossed (and still crosses) through the triangle's area.

    The swift Gulf Stream ocean current flows through the triangle after leaving the West Indies. The combination of heavy maritime traffic and tempestuous weather made it inevitable that vessels could founder in storms and be lost without a trace — especially before improved telecommunications, radar and satellite technology arrived late in the 20th century. Vessels still sink occasionally, but rarely without a trace.[1]

    Other areas often purported to possess unusual characteristics are the Devil's Sea, located near Japan, and the Marysburgh Vortex (or "Great Lakes Triangle"), located in eastern Lake Ontario. However, the "Devil's Sea" is not particularly well known in Japan, because most vessels lost were small fishing boats with no radios.

    Christopher Columbus mentioned sightings of strange-looking animals near the border of the now designated "Bermuda Triangle", reporting that he and his crew observed "strange dancing lights on the horizon". On another occasion they observed what was most likely a falling meteor.[2] At another point he wrote in his log about bizarre compass bearings in the area.

    The first documented mention of disappearances in the area was made in 1951 by E.V.W. Jones as a sidebar on the Associated Press wire service regarding recent ship losses. Jones' article noted the "mysterious disappearances" of ships, aircraft and small boats in the region and gave it the name "The Devil's Triangle". It was next mentioned in 1952 in a Fate Magazine article by George X. Sand, who outlined several "strange marine disappearances". In 1964, Vincent Geddis referred to the area as "The Deadly Bermuda Triangle" in an Argosy feature, after which the name "Bermuda Triangle" became most common.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I think that was the triangular spot you find between a ladies leg - landscaped with black Bermuda grass.

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  • 1 decade ago

    its a geographical area in the atlantic ocean....many planes and ships have disappeared while passing through this area and couldnot be discovered tilll today....those who went in search for them also disapperaed...you can find alot about it on the net...i hope this is enough to have you an overall idea of it

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  • 1 decade ago

    an area in the carribean seas where quie a lot of airplanes and veasels suddenly dissapeared without a trace

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Supposedly planes and boats disappear there.

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  • 1 decade ago

    A fantasy. Nothing to see here. Move along please folks.

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