how to convert 03.5 million litters of water to pressure?

I would like to know how to convert the weight of water to the pressure unit. I mean I have thousand litres of water and I want to know how much pressure it comes, in psi or bar

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    it depends on the dimension of the container or the depth of the water. more depth equals more pressure

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    How much does the water weigh? And how deep is the water? If you don't need the depth then it's real easy. Find the weight of a square litre of water and find out how many square litres you have and then multiply. Then apply the pressure measurement (or yardstick) wanted. If I can lift a two pound rock I'm exerting two pounds of pressure upwards. So find out how much a square litre of water weighs, multiply by number of square liters. Remember your elementary physics, water can't be condensed. Air can be condensed but water can't, so the weight of a square litre of water multiplied by the number of square litres is the water pressure.

    If you do need to use depth, then all you have to do is measure the number of square litres from the bottom to the top of the tank and the pressure will be a lot less. Litres is weight, so you'll have to convert a square litre into a volume which should be in your textbook. So if the tank is ten meters deep, it will have x amount of square litres. Since it's metric it's always square litres and square metres. A square metre of feathers will take up this much square metres. A square litre of water takes up this many square metres (or centimeters 100 parts of a metre or millimeters a thousand parts of a metre.) You'll be able to find a volume to weight conversion tables on the net that will tell you the volume of a weight of many liquids and solids on the Net (Google it) most dictionaries have weight/volume tables. With metric, if your doing anything more than move the decimal point, you are doing too much work and it is always square litres and square metres, that NEVER changes in metric.

  • 1 decade ago

    kloackste is right. 2.31 psi per foot of water. example: city water pressure is 64 lbs. , then the city water tower has 148 feet of water in it.

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