What is the benefit of using screensaver??

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  • 1 decade ago
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    A screensaver is a computer program originally designed to conserve the image quality of computer displays by blanking the screen or filling them with moving images or patterns when the computers are not in use. Today, screensavers are primarily used for entertainment or security purposes.

    Before the proliferation of LCD screens, most computer screens depended on cathode ray tubes (CRTs). Images on a CRT monitor are generated using electron beams which are emitted from electron guns at the back of the tube, and manipulated by electromagnetic fields to form images line-by-line on the phosphorescent screen many times per second. In some situations the images displayed on the screen constantly change, but in other cases some areas of the screen, or the screen as a whole, change very little (the taskbar in Microsoft Windows, for example). When the same image is displayed on a CRT screen for long periods of time, the properties of the exposed areas of phosphor coating on the inside of the screen gradually and permanently change, eventually leading to a darkened shadow or "ghost" image on the screen. Televisions, oscilloscopes and other devices that use CRTs are all susceptible to phosphor burn-in, as are plasma displays to some extent.

    Source(s): Wikipedia
  • 1 decade ago

    Screensavers were originally designed to protect computer monitors from “phosphor” burn-in. Early CRT monitors, particularly monochrome ones, had problems with the same image being displayed for a long time.

    The phosphors, used to make the pixels in the display, would glow at a constant rate for such a long period of time that they would actually discolor the glass surface of the CRT.

    This discoloration would then be visible as a faint image overlaying whatever else was displayed on the monitor. Advances in display technology and the advent of energy-saver monitors have virtually eliminated the need for screensavers. But we still use them for entertainment and other reasons.

    For instance, companies, particularly retail businesses, that have computers in areas accessible to customers will often have a screensaver that promotes their business or product.

    Note: Using your screensaver can add security - By setting up a screensaver with password protection, you can walk away from your computer and feel comfortable that nobody is going to be able to see any sensitive information.

    Source(s): Source: howstuffworks.com
  • 1 decade ago

    Anymore, not much. Most monitors have settings where they will go in sleep mode or something after a while, so screen savers are rather superfluous now.

    Used to, monitors needed it to keep from burning out or permanently burning an image into the screen. You used to have burnout much more on CRT monitors. Even some LCD ones you could, but highly unlikely. If you have a CRT monitor then I'd still use it.

    Mainly just for decoration, although you can "lock" the screen using a screen saver, so that if you are away from the computer for a little while, it will require a password. So now that's about all that is really, practically beneficial.

  • 1 decade ago

    It won't burn an image on to your screen.

    Before the proliferation of LCD screens, most computer screens depended on cathode ray tubes (CRTs). Images on a CRT monitor are generated using electron beams which are emitted from electron guns at the back of the tube, and manipulated by electromagnetic fields to form images line-by-line on the phosphorescent screen many times per second. In some situations the images displayed on the screen constantly change, but in other cases some areas of the screen, or the screen as a whole, change very little (the taskbar in Microsoft Windows, for example). When the same image is displayed on a CRT screen for long periods of time, the properties of the exposed areas of phosphor coating on the inside of the screen gradually and permanently change, eventually leading to a darkened shadow or "ghost" image on the screen. Televisions, oscilloscopes and other devices that use CRTs are all susceptible to phosphor burn-in, as are plasma displays to some extent.

    Screensaver programs were originally designed to help avoid these effects by automatically changing the images on the screen when the computer was not in use (thus "saving" the screen). They can be usually set up to launch automatically, waiting a specified amount of time after the last keystroke or the last mouse movement made by a user. The screensaver then blanks the screen, or more commonly produces animation effects, thus avoiding any "fixed" images. The screensaver remains active until a user presses a key or makes a mouse movement. At that moment, the screensaver closes and the former screen contents are restored, allowing the user to work again.

    For CRTs used in public embedded applications such as ATMs and railway ticketing machines, the risk of burn-in is especially high because a stand-by display is shown whenever the machine is not in use. Older machines designed without burn-in problems taken into consideration often display evidence of screen damage, with images or text such as "Please insert your card" (in the case of ATMs) visible even when the display changes while the machine is in use. Blanking the screen is out of the question as it would make the machine look out of service. Thus, in these applications, burn-in is prevented by moving the contents of the display around every few seconds, or by having a number of different images that are changed regularly.

    Modern CRTs are much less susceptible to burn-in than older models due to improvements in phosphor coatings, and because modern computer images are generally lower contrast than the stark green- or white-on-black text and graphics of earlier machines. LCD computer monitors, including the display panels used in laptop computers, are not susceptible to burn-in because the image is not directly produced by phosphors (although they can suffer from a less extreme and usually non-permanent form of image persistence). For these reasons, screensavers today are primarily decorative or for entertainment, and usually feature moving images or patterns and sometimes sound effects.

    Einstein@Home automatically scans astronomical data for evidence of pulsarsOne increasingly popular application is for screensavers to activate a useful background task, such as a virus scan or a distributed computing application (such as the SETI@home project). This is convenient because these applications only use resources when the computer would be otherwise idle.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    A screensaver is a computer program originally designed to conserve the image quality of computer displays by blanking the screen or filling them with moving images or patterns when the computers are not in use. Today, screensavers are primarily used for entertainment or security purposes.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    none at all - except to look cool to your friends and work colleagues.

    In the days of early CRT monitors a screen saver that showed a moving image was used because old monitors would "etch" a image onto the screen if the same picture was displayed for too long. Nowadays monitors don't damage the screen like that and the screensaver has no real practical function. In fact, in these energy-conscious times, a screen saver just wastes energy and contributes to global warming, pollution, the end of the world etc etc.

  • Sonu G
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    A screen saver is a computer program originally designed to conserve the image quality of computer displays by blanking the screen or filling them with moving images or patterns when the computers are not in use.

  • 1 decade ago

    It helps prolong the life of your monitor if you leave it on all the time. If you don't use one and don't turn the monitor off you will eventually have an image burned into the screen.

  • 1 decade ago

    So the image doesn't burn into the screen. If that happens you have to get a new monitor. There is no fixing it. It happens to tv's sometimes too.

  • 1 decade ago

    if you are a notebook it is no use to you computer.if you are a CRT screen so the screen can protect you CRT screen.

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