what is the importance of stomata to plants?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Guard cells control the dimensions of stoma .

    It is through the stomata gaseous exchange takes place.

    That is why guard cells and stomata are important to a plant.

    Source(s): Plant Physiology Books
  • 1 decade ago

    Stomata are microscopic pores found on the under side of leaves. You will find the stomata in the epidermal tissue. The stomata is bounded by two half moon shaped guard cells that function to vary the width of the pore. Each guard cell contains chloroplasts. The glucose concentration of the the cells changes with the photosynthetic activity and therefore it is the guard cells that regulate the opening and closing of the stoma.

    Plants carry on the process of photosynthesis by combining together several ingredients in their leaves. Some of these materials are gaseous( carbon dioxide), some are liquid ( water ), and one is energy ( sunlight ). If one were to look at the anatomy of a leaf, it would be easy to see how these materials are brought to the leaf so that they can form the food. The stomata is the way in which this transfer of ingredients can occur, transferring the CO2, light and water from the surrounding atmosphere in to the plant.

    In light the guard cells swell, causing the pore to be at its widest, and CO2 diffuses into the leaf and into the cells to be assimilated in photosynthesis. In the dark or under drought conditions the guard cells are not turgid, the stomata are closed and no photosynthesis takes place. Opening of the stomata not only allows CO2 to diffuse into the leaf, but allows water vapor to diffuse out of the leaf. The alteration in the size of the stomata occur in response to a variety of the external stimuli such as light, carbon dioxide concentration and water.

    The stomata is situated on the underside of the leaf for the reason that if it were on the top side the plant would lose to much water. Because the guard cells are partially light activated, plants under direct sunlight would constantly have their stomata open and would thus lose much water and the plant

  • 4 years ago

    I don't know much about stomata, but the primary importance, I think, is gas exchange. During photosynthesis, stomata open to allow gases to be exchanged. in this process, water do get lost. For plants that are not good with conserving water such as seedless vascular plants, stomata actually close when there was not enough water circulating the plant to prevent further water loss until the roots replenish the plant with enough water.

  • 1 decade ago

    4 MAIN FUNCTIONS!!!

    1) To enable the exchange of the air, mainly oxygen and carbon dioxide.

    2) To remove water from the plant when there is excess water in the plant.

    3) Able to cool and maintain the temperature of the surrounding area when it release oxygen.

    4) During hot day, it closes to prevent water to be removed from the leaves. This prevent the loss of water in plants during hot day.

    Stomata mainly use when photosynthesis take place!!!

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  • 1 decade ago

    Stomata are tiny pores on the underside of leaves. Their function is to transfer the reactants of photsynthesis into the leaf and the waste products out. stomata consist of two guard cells that swell to let co2 and O2 into the leaf and water vapor and O2 out. When stomata are closed, photosynthesis cannot occur.

  • 1 decade ago

    They're for exchanging gases

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    stomata are nostrils of plants.they help in gaseous exchange. water is also lost through them in the form of vapour.

  • 1 decade ago

    they are pores that help the plants to absorb carbondioxide, in return process of PHOTOSYNTHESIS...IS ACHEIVED so its a cycle...and pores contribute to this.

  • 1 decade ago

    what is the importance of your mouth, nose and lungs?

  • 4 years ago

    i dont know the answer

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