English to latin translation??

Can anyone translate, "Of stable mind," or "A balanced state of mind," or something that sounds much better to signify overcoming depression from English into Latin? I have recently overcome my balance with Bipolar and am taking no medications and feeling great! I would like to get a small tatoo to symbolize this feat! If anyone can help it would mean a lot. Thanks!

By the way, I have search high and low for a translator online and have not found one that worked.. BabelFish is great but does not offer Latin translations. :(

Update:

Wow you guys are great! Even the 8th grade translation rocks ( she had the prettiest way of saying it) :) Thank you all!

Update 2:

As for ink color, I have light skin and would get this tat on the inside of my wrist. Could I get an ink color other than black? I heard white is possible... what about shades of brown?

12 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    http://www.translation-guide.com/free_online_trans...

    Go here and you can do a free English to Latin translation. Congrats on overcoming your disorder. =D

  • dest
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Latin To English Translation Babelfish

  • 4 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    English to latin translation??

    Can anyone translate, "Of stable mind," or "A balanced state of mind," or something that sounds much better to signify overcoming depression from English into Latin? I have recently overcome my balance with Bipolar and am taking no medications and feeling great! I would like to...

    Source(s): english latin translation: https://shortly.im/3D6UX
  • AskAsk
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Mens aequa. A stable mind, a balanced mind.

    or:

    Mente aequa - of stable mind.

    I think that "Mens aequa" would be´the best choice, since it is of literary and well known origin. The Roman poet Horatius (Horace) wrote the famous ode that has been called "Mens aequa in arduis" (see source below). "A steady mind in tribulation". These words have been a popular motto for many people of Epicurean leanings. But it actually says that one should have a steady mind in times of "giddy joy", too, so i think it's a perfect choice in your case. In Latin and in English translation:

    Aequam memento rebus in arduis

    seruare mentem, non secus in bonis

    ab insolentia temperatam

    laetitia, moriture Delli,

    seu maestus omni tempore uixeris,

    seu te in remoto gramine per dies

    festos reclinatum bearis

    interiore nota Falerni

    "Remember, Dellius, since you must die,

    to keep a steady mind in difficult circumstances,

    and likewise in good circumstances a mind

    free from giddy joy,

    whether you'll live always in sorrow,

    or whether on holidays you'll stretch out

    on a retired, grassy spot and regale yourself with

    a choice vintage of Falernian ..."

    Latin translators will hardly ever give you a good translation. Writing in Latin is so totally unlike writing in English that most machine generated translations will be completely wrong, especially grammar-wise. If you still want to use a machine translation, ask someone who really knows Latin if the translation is correct, or otherwise it will just look silly.

    Happy to see that your medication works! Look at it as that choice Falernian wine...

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    On-line Latin translators are either useless, or worse.

    The old Latin phrase "mens sana in corpore sano" was often quoted as the ideal objective for a school - usually translated as "a healthy mind in a healthy body". The dictionary agrees with this, saying :-

    Sanus, sana = (1) physically sound, whole, healthy; and (2) figuratively: sound in mind, rational, sane, sober etc.

    So "mens sana" captures all the meaning you want, and for many people it will be a recognisable and familiar phrase, too. Congratulations on your achievement.

    Source(s): Dr. Smith's Smaller Latin-English Dictionary.
  • Betty
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Ab memet (ipso) salva me quia nescio quod facere debeo. Don't trust "googling", those translations usually aren't any good.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I'm in 8th grade and study Latin but I'm afraid I don't know all of those words yet. Would this phrase be ok? Meus mens est solvo-My mind is free, Of stabilis mens-Of stable mind, Vinco- I conquer, Lucem video - I see the light, Malam fortunam vinco- I conquer bad fortune.

    Source(s): My text book and a lot of memorizing. lol.
    • 6 years agoReport

      Remember- adjectives agree with the nouns they modify in case, number, and gender! "Meus" is an adjective, and mens is a femine noun!

      Even if OP is male, it would be "mea mens est solva," and you may want to try putting that verb at the end (looks way cooler/more Roman!) Good job, keep studying!

  • 3 years ago

    That's a good question

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    http://catholic.archives.nd.edu/cgi-bin/lookup

    http://catholic.archives.nd.edu/cgi-bin/lookdown.p...

    "In compote mentis" would be adeaquate in my view, that means "in control of the mind"

    or maybe " in mente integra " = (being) in a balanced/whole mind

    You have to be careful with the Notre Dame guys, they sometimes have the most obscure words, go to Whitaker's to make sure, there's a link there on the site, but only for Latin.

  • 1 decade ago

    Ex animus fortus or ex animus bonus

    that's from strong mind or good mind

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