How do I make good black coffe?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Well, for starters..... go buy yourself some decent coffee. No Folgers, No Maxwell House!! Go get some Kona Coffee ( hawaii) or Jamaican Blue Mountain ( Jamaica.... duh!) at any coffe shop or possibly even your local grocery store. These make a great cup of Black coffee full of aroma and body without any bitter after taste!! Just follow the intructions on the can or bag and use a standard coffee maker. Good luck and enjoy!!

    Source(s): Coffee Connoiseur!!
  • 1 decade ago

    The easiest way is to buy a $20 french press. Grind the beans coarsely, so the individual grinds are larger than a grain of sand (you can use a blade grinder, for around $15 on sale, but a more expensive burr grinder will give much better uniformity). Put the ground coffee in the french press. Boil water, but add a couple of tablespoons of cold water before pouring it onto the beans -- the temperature should be around 204 degrees farenheit. Pour the hot water onto the ground beans, stir the resulting slurry, and fit the lid loosely onto the press, without pressing the plunger. Leave for 4-5 minutes. Then depress the plunger, and drink.

    The other good low-price option is to get a Chemex coffee brewer, and the square filters that go with it. These run around $30+. Again, very low tech: grind beans, boil your own water, pour it on, and so forth. I'll include a link to more details at the bottom. There are many people who believe this is the best cup of standard-strength coffee you can make.

    From there, you enter more expensive territory. Drip brewers are very easy and convenient, but despite their greater cost, the quality is generally not as good as the options above. Typically, water temperature is a little too low, and depending on the design, the water may not properly mix with the slurry. But if you're going this route, try to avoid hotplates, and instead get one that brews directly into a vacuum carafe. Technivorm has a good reputation for raw quality (and looks cool), but comes at a price premium.

    I don't know much about the vacpots, but they're also definitely worth a look, and come in lower on the price scale than good quality brewers.

    Finally, there's espresso, in which the water is pumped through very finely-ground coffee at high pressure. If you're really looking for a quality product here, your entry point will be at least $200 for a no-frills espresso machine, and another $100 for a grinder capable of grinding for espresso. The cheapest setup I'd recommend is a Gaggia Carezza ($220-ish) and a Solis Maestro grinder (around $100). Don't get a Krups or equivalent espresso machine from a store -- look online, read the myriad reviews, and find something in the right range. If you're willing to go a little higher, the Rancilio Silvia with Rancilio Rocky grinder will allow you to brew espresso that's better than the vast majority of coffee houses, mainly due to the overall low level of barrista training (although you won't have nearly the throughput of a commercial machine).

    Hope this helps.

    Source(s): Look at http://www.howtobrewcoffee.com/chemex.htm for info on brewing with Chemex. Also, there's lots of great info at http://www.coffeegeek.com.
  • 1 decade ago

    I assume you are using a brewing machine and not instant coffee.

    I use a heaping tablespoon for every two cups of water for everyday coffee. I suggest one tablespoon per cup for string black coffee.

    The MOST IMPORTANT thing is to start with a good quality coffee. I recommend Gevalia.

    Just make a half a pot or less to try out what you like best.

    Good Luck!

  • 1 decade ago

    First, buy good coffee, fresh and vacuum packed

    Second- grind them just before brewing.

    Third, measure the coffee to water ration precisely.

    4. Brew with passably good tasting water. Drink within 30 minutes of brewing. Throw out unused coffee after 40 minutes, one hour max.

    5. If you have to use sugar, use honey,demerara or muscovado.

    Enjoy.

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  • 4 years ago

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    For good coffee you need fresh roasted coffee beans. After roasting coffee loses it flavor rather quickly 3 weeks for beans 3 to 4 days for ground. vacume seal helps and delay time a bit. The best coffee is fresh roasted and shipped to you that day then ground as you need it for coffee.

  • 1 decade ago

    Use fresh roasted beans for one, not ground coffee. Figure 2 tablespoons of whole beans for every 4-6 oz of water depending how strong you like it. Make sure to use filtered water.

    I prefer espresso, if you try that route, take 1 tablespoon of whole beans (then grind) for every 2 oz of water.

    I can't stress the freshness of your beans.

  • 1 decade ago

    I like my coffee black and strong so what i do is i put a tablespoon per cup that usually makes it good and strong. Or just put less water than coffee...

  • 1 decade ago

    Grind your own beans, like French Roast or Columbian. Use cold water and voila! Good coffee.

  • 6 years ago

    From there, you enter more expensive territory. Drip brewers are very easy and convenient, but despite their greater cost, the quality is generally not as good as the options above. Typically, water temperature is a little too low, and depending on the design, the water may not properly mix with the slurry. But if you're going this route, try to avoid hotplates, and instead get one that brews directly into a vacuum carafe. Technivorm has a good reputation for raw quality (and looks cool), but comes at a price premium.

    Source(s): www.myolbd.com
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