Why do cars in the UK and some other countries (Australia) have the cars' steering wheels on the "other" side?

It has been a question I had lived with all my life. I live in the USA. Are we the ones that are wrong?? Is it better to drive on the other side?

6 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    in the UK having the driver on the right hand side will put him closer to the centre of the road that means they can see more of the road and can see around the car in front easyer for overtaking. and its the same in the US they drive on the right so the driver must be seated on the left to see more of the road. so no one is wrong. its only convenience

  • chante
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Well we invented the car, right? So it should be on the "right" right side? but it's not.

    In the UK, they drive on the left side, so the driver is also on the left side. It goes back to the fact that horse and buggies already had been established on the left side, because of the wide turn they needed. Who knows where I picked up this info -- maybe on Yahoo Answers!!

  • 1 decade ago

    In days gone by, knights of the realm would pass each other to the right. In this manner you could present your "sword hand" and show that you held no weapon. The knights would then grasp the others right forearm in greeting to insure that there were no weapons hidden up the sleeve. But a knight had to be wary of the hand sinister (left hand) in case the other knight held a weapon in that hand. This is why it is the custom that vehicles (motor driven and otherwise) pass each other right side to right side in some countries.

  • Lab
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Would you wear the same clothes as your friends?

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  • 1 decade ago

    "we invented the car"

    Chante's statement made laugh a lot!!

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    They are all postal carriers. Everyone of them.

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