can you compare the whole numbers when comparing 1 3/4 and 1 1/3 ?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    compare 3/4 with 1/3. Also 3*3>1*4 then 3/4>1/3.END!

  • 1 decade ago

    comparing 1 3/4 and 1 1/3 ?

    Yes you can. We are really comparing 1 + 3/4 to 1 + 1/3.

    Since both fractions are proper (< 1), we can say that both of the given numbers are >1 and < 2.

    If you were asked to round the two mixed numbers to the nearest whole number, then 1 3/4 would be rounded up to 2 and

    1 1/3 would be rounded down to 1.

    If you were asked to compare 1,000,000 1/10 to 100,000 1/10, you could safely forget the 1/10 since it is negligible compared to the whole number. The first number is 10 times the second if we disregard the fractional part. If we include the fractional part, then the first number is 9.999991 times the second. Unless measurements are critical and require extreme accuracy, the whole number dominates in a mixed number especially when the whole number is large.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    1 3/4 = 1.75

    1 1/3 = 1.333....

    Just pick a calculator and divide 3 by 4 and add to the 1 to get how much a fraction is. Then you can compare them in a very easy way.

    You don't actually need to pick a calculator, just think that 3/4 is less than 1. So, it doesn't change the whole number

    To know if a fraction is equals, more or less than 1, just consider this:

    1 = 3/3 = 4/4 = 20/20, etc

    Think of a cake, if you splitt it in 3 pieces, and you eat the 3 of them, then you ate the whole cake.

    If you splitt it in 3 pieces and you ate 1, you ate less than 1 cake

    So 1/3 is less than 1. So is 3/4 or 5/20.

    But if you want to eat 20 pieces from a cake that it's splitted in quarters, then you will need 5 cakes. So, 20/5 is more than 1, it's equals to 5

    So: 5/4 is more than 1, so are 30/20 or 5/2

    I hope that helps you.

    Anabel

  • 1 decade ago

    Sure you can. They're equal. And, therefore, it's the fractional part of the mixed number that contains the information about which number is larger (or smaller).

    Doug

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