What is proper when giving a knife as a gift? Giving a penny or getting a penny?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    See info below regarding this knife superstition and other knife superstitions. See link below for further reading about knives.

    Knife superstitions

    In some places it is traditionally believed that the giving of a knife as a gift to a friend will cut or sever the relationship. To avoid such ill luck, the receiver should give a coin in return so as to "pay" for the gift. It is common to include a penny, often taped to the blade, with a knife given as a gift which the receiver is to return as "payment".

    Stirring liquids or powders with a knife is often considered unlucky. One rhyme says, "Stir with a knife, stir up strife".

    In some cultures giving a knife as a gift is considered a sign of respect and trust. This is especially true in Finland where various non-governmental organizations, clubs and even government agencies traditionally give a puukko (a Finnish fixed-blade hunting/outdoor knife) as a gift to trusted employers or contacts. The puukko is always presented handle first as a sign of trust and friendly intentions.

    In many places in the United States it is considered bad luck to hand an open, folding blade knife to someone. This is especially true in more rural areas where carrying a pocket knife is as common as carrying a set of keys. This may stem from safety issues. It is also believed that allowing someone to close a folding blade knife that you have opened is bad luck.

    Just as with swords, regional and cultural superstitions exist regarding the treatment of knives that are used in combat. One common superstition states that it is bad luck to return a combat knife from its sheath without using it to draw blood. A variant myth exists surrounding drawing a knife (e.g. a sgian dubh) without drawing the blood of a cultural enemy (e.g an Englishman). Sometimes these superstitions are actually attempts to insult the culture of the supposed believer.

    Some cultures believe that a knife does not belong to an individual until it has 'bit' them, or tasted their blood. Believers in such superstitions may intentionally prick a finger on the blade of a knife rather than risk a later, accidental cut. According to this superstition, the knife will stay sharp longer and is less likely to accidentally cut its owner once it has tasted his or her blood.

    In some parts of America, it is considered bad luck to sharpen a knife, or any blade, after dark.

    :-)

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  • ries
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Pocket Knife Gift

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  • 3 years ago

    I think that giving knife as a gift when giving me a penny.

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  • rhoat
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Knives As Gifts

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  • 1 decade ago

    Getting a penny

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  • 4 years ago

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    In ancient times, giving someone a blade was often an order to commit suicide. If one refused to kill themselves, they were summarily executed. By giving a small amount of money with the blade, it made it obvious that it is simply a gift.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The receiver should give the giver a penny.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Getting - the person you give the knife to must "buy" it from you, or the friendship is "cut"

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