my son just got mercury from a thermometer on him, do i need to take him to the er?

he busted it with a lighter

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  • Paul
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Just wash it off. It doesn't sound like it was a lot, since it was just a thermometer. (Somebody broke a 2-foot long mercury thermometer in chemistry class once, and there wasn't much mercury.)

    It shouldn't be inhaled and it needs to be washed off well if its on their skin.

    I was looking around on the internet, and while Mercury can be very hazardous, I don't think a small amount requires a trip to the emergency room.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    How toxic is elemental mercury?

    Of all the forms of mercury, elemental mercury is the most commonly swallowed form of mercury, usually from a broken thermometer. Fortunately, elemental mercury from a thermometer is not absorbed from the stomach and will not cause any poisoning in a healthy person. In a healthy person, the slippery swallowed mercury will roll into the stomach, out in to the bowels and will be quickly eliminated without causing any symptoms. A person with severe inflammatory bowel disease or those with a fistula (hole or opening) in their gut may have problems with mercury if it is not all cleared out, resulting in prolonged exposure. Handling liquid mercury for a very short period of time usually does not result in any problems. An allergic rash is possible, though. Mercury is not well absorbed across the skin so skin contact is not likely to cause mercury poisoning, especially with a brief one-time exposure. Even if a person has cuts in their skin, mercury is too heavy to be contained by a cut. Merely washing the wound well will wash the mercury out of the wound.

  • M
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    If a small amount was only in contact with his skin, he should be OK. If you are very concerned, contact your local poison control center, or if you do not know that number (it should be in your phone book's emergency number section) the local hospital or your family physician should be able to set your mind at ease.

    Mercury has only been considered hazardous for a farily short period of time. My mother talks about playing with beads of it in her hands when she was a child, and neither she, nor I, have any damage from it.

  • 1 decade ago

    YES GO NOW and YOU will have to have the mercury cleaned it will have to be down professionally because Mercury is very poisoness has to cleaned up with special equipment.

    and to the person under me No the asker is not a bad parent, i would guess they already called the ER or doctor and are just asking to see if anyone has any addition ideas, how about you don't judge people without knowing them!!!!

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  • 1 decade ago

    mercury is harmless in small amounts, in fact some peoploe take it for some kind of sickness but the details dont come to mind, im tired

  • 1 decade ago

    i think it's better to take him to the hospital... since he's only a child... and since the mercury comes from a thermometer, we're not sure if there's some broken pieces from the thermometer itself... or.. call the poison control first ...

  • 1 decade ago

    He should be fine, but I would take him to the hospital to be safe. I could make him sick if there was anyway he swallowed it. Anyway, I won't even ask how old your son is and WHY he was playing with a lighter (especially around glass). But anyway, good luck and God Bless.

  • 1 decade ago

    Mercury is considered hazardous material and you may need to call the fire department for help in disposal.

    Don't flush it down the toilet or into the sink etc.

    It needs to be contained and disposed of properly.

  • 1 decade ago

    I think unless he ingested it he will be ok....but I don't know for sure. You might want to call a nurse just in case. I know that if he got any in his mouth DO NOT PASS GO..go to the hospital.

  • 1 decade ago

    Call a doctor or the ER and ask for their advice.

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