does anyone know how to draw a real person?

i am practicing how to draw a person' face but it takes me too long, so i would like to know what are the first steps i can start on drawing to make it easier for me

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I always start with outline, face and I position lines to help me draw eyes mouth and nose on right place. Then I start with shades.

    Check links below for help ful step by step tutorial.

    http://www.artyfactory.com/portraits/pencil_portra...

    http://www.portrait-artist.org/face/index.html

    http://www.portrait-artist.org/face/profile.html

  • 1 decade ago

    Draw what you see. Do you see lines? I hope not. I hope you see a 3-dimensional object. Try beaking down the skull into basic shapes (sphere, cube, etc.), then working up to a finished drawing. Keep all the categories of light in mind. It would help to know what's underneath the surface. I suggest making some sketches out of an anatomy book. I learned a rule of thumb in woodshop that I apply to art: ...the right tool for the right job. You should practice gesture drawing, toned-paper drawings. In general you want to train your eye to 'look'. And trust your eye just as well. The last, most importantthing you need to know: see it done. Go to a museum or gallery and view a portrait. You could even look at a painting for pointers, but you want to see a drawing for sure.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Grab a picture of a person, whether it's a model from a magazine or a photograph of yourself.You'll need some lined paper, a pencil, and a good eraser.

    When you are looking at a real person, it's easier to draw out regular human features, like the nose and eyes.It also helps the size of the body parts;for example, the eyes and lips are a similar size.

    This will help you a lot as a developing artist.

    Source(s): Me ^^
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    http://drawinglab.evansville.edu/

    I suggest picking the highest-quality art teachers. I had an excellent one for a drawing workshop. She owned a bed and breakfast in Jasper and drew on an amateur basis but was a rising artist in England before she moved here. She had a Master's degree in Fine Arts.

    The one I see now is some self-appointed renegade with a bad attitude who can only teach the basics. She doesn't even have a degree. I believe art teachers should be professionals with experience, or else, should have degrees. I am changing my teacher and going back to drawing. There is someone else I have in mind. Check around, there can be courses through the local art gallery and colleges.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It is not easy and it does take time, there aren't really any short cuts. One good way to practice, though, is to trace faces from art books and even trace over faces in newspaper photos. It helps give you a feel for the contours of faces and the pen/pencil movements needed to reproduce them. Check out the library, too, for books (look in the catalog under "Drawing -- Technique"). They can give you tips on learning proportion, symmetry, and point of view, all things you'll need to know about to draw realistic images.

    Source(s): I'm a commercial artist.
  • 1 decade ago

    Start off with an egg shape for the head, draw a horizontal line in the middle of the head to represent the eyes. Measure your model's nose and make a horizontal line between the eyes and the chin, relative to the length of the model's nose. measure the space between the tip of your model's nose to the center line of the lips and make another line. Keep taking measurements, and find relationships between facial features measuring things like tops of ears to tops of eyes or pupils to the corners of the mouth, etc. Hold your pencil up to the model to find the direction of angles and to properly scale proportions. Work methodically and find as many relationships as you can until you have a completed representation.

  • 1 decade ago

    California College of Arts intro to drawing told me to get a newsprint tablet and charcoal and sketch your subjects WITH OUT looking at your paper. You are training your hand to be an extension of your eyes. Do very quick sketches. Instructor suggested riding the bus where you sit across from another person and sketch the people who come and go along the way.

  • 1 decade ago

    i took a class once for charcoal...

    draw an oval. draw a horizontal line where you feel the nose should be, and also a vertical line to indicate what side the face is facing. these lines are going to be slightly curved to give the oval a 3-D effect. start sketching indentations for where the eyes, hairline, nose, mouth should be. it is quite mathematical... halfway down from the middle line to chin is the lips, so on and so forth. good luck!

  • 1 decade ago

    my advice is to draw from life as much as possible. draw people who are right in front of you, family, friends, coworkers. try not to draw from photographs so much otherwise your drawings might turn out looking flat. I also recommend one of the links a previous poster put up. Portrait Artist helped me from the beginning and all of the pages are very encouraging. Good luck!

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