Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Home & GardenDo It Yourself (DIY) · 1 decade ago

cordless drills keyless chucks- am i missing something in the term keyless- they slip like hell?

13 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    IF your drill has a clutch on it adjust it to the highest setting. Put your bit in the chuck. Make sure the drill is in forward, grip the chuck in your left hand tightly will hitting the trigger. This should tighten the chuck. IF it doesn't you have one of two problems, either the chuck is defective or you are to weak to get a good grip on the chuck to tighten it sufficiently. Either way, take it back it back where you got it and have ehm show how to do it.

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  • Sara
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    I've never had a problem with keyless chucks, I have however experienced losing the key for the keyed chucks. The beauty of keyless chucks is the speed of changing out bits without having to fumble with a key. There are manufactures of drill presses now that are keyless, but I imagine that the speed and power of the drill press is the reason why they are still primarily keyed.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Actually... Milwaukee uses Jacobs brand chucks... they dont make them themselves, heheh... not any Ive owned or used at least, and being a production manager, Ive bought many over the years.

    The "keyless" chuck's popularity, is due to the fact that you can quickly make changes, and you don't have to worry about losing that silly key... yeah.. Im old enough to have done that... lol.

    Now... if you have a cordless drill you really like... and just hate the keyluss chuck... You can replace it! Most industrial tool companies sell the Jacobs line, and they are a top quality brand of drill chuck. Most drills use only a 3/8" chuck, but many of the heavier drills come with 1/2" standard. If you are going to be running some large bore holes... get the 1/2".

    I have an AEG brand 9 volt, that I bought years ago... when the 7 volts were just starting to get popular. I got it with the keyed Jacobs chuck (1/2"), a steel case, charger and a couple of batteries.. and it still works. (AEG was a Milwaukee product line) I used it for years on the job... and have gotten a lot of wear and tear out of it. I specifically had the keyed chuck ordered for that drill, because I was running 1/2" drill bit shanks.... and I didnt want to depend on my grip in wet weather to hold that in place, hehehe. I replaced the keyless chuck, with the keyed chuck myself... (both Jacobs chucks by the way) I was so happy with that drill I bought several more for the crew, of the Milwaukee brand (bright red, instead of the AEG black... easier to see them when they got left laying around, lol... a lesson DeWalt took to heart, lol)

    Like I said... if you dont like your current chuck... replace it.

    Heres the Jacob's website if you'd like to look at their products...

    http://www.jacobschuck.com/

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    J was leading to it...but I think what he was trying to ask was if the drill had a "clutch". Most cordless drill have a clutch system on it as not to strip out screw heads. You can change the sensitivity of the drill to "disengage" if it gets too much pressure from the screw. If you are doing just drilling, then you should have a setting on there as well that will completely deactivate the clutch. If the bits are spinning in the in drill head, then its just a matter of getting the chuck tight enough, which improves with your ability to hold the keyless chuck tighter.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Apparently when key-less chucks first came out, the engineers who designed the things did not properly calculate the torque required to adequately tighten the chuck around the bit. Thus all the slipping many have experienced. Why these same tool manufacturers didn't properly test them is a mystery, unless it was designed obsolescence. Anyways, the thread pitch they used in the chucks needed to be adjusted so that the same amount of torque applied to the chuck for tightening, would apply more pressure on the bit. I think most manufacturers are jumping on this bandwagon now.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I have a Millwaukee drill with a keyless chuck. Had it for 10 years, works like a charm.

    Check with the place you bought the drill, I bet if you are new to keyless chucks that you are "missing something", once you get it figureds out they are pretty simple to use, & very reliable.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Is the bit slipping in the chuck or is the chuck skipping?

    Many cordless drills today have an adjustable tension chuck that automatically fails at a given tension so that you don't over torque nuts, screws, etc.

    Look and see, because it's VERY rare that the bit would slip in the chuck itself.

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  • 1 decade ago

    doug is right, the milwaukee chuck is the best out there. i've had or used makita, dewalt, bosch, and others but now got the best! this thing locks up and it ain't gonna slip. one other thought, if you r drill bits are scored from slipping replace them as you'll never tighten a screwed up bit.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Some of the older ones do, the newer ones don't slip or, aren't suppose to, mine doesn't, a 12 V De Walt, my old Milwaukee didn't either.

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  • hunter
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    I recently picked one up at Sears and U have to put your finger on a button to hold the armature while you tighten the chuck.Works like a charm as all others I had did .

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