Does anyone know any critics for THE THORN BIRDS and/or SHOGUN, the novels?

Hi all

I am doing my coursework and need help... I am comparing two very popular novels "The Thorn Birds" by Colleen McCullough and "Shogun" by James Clavell, but cannot find any critics opinions. I really need your help, as one of the main objectives is I find out what critics think. Anything you have will be welcomes, whether it be writen in the 1970's (when the novels came out) or recently...Counting on you people :):):)

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  • 1 decade ago
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    The Thorn Birds is a 1977 best-selling novel by Colleen McCullough, an Australian author. In 1983 it was adapted as a television mini-series that, during its television run became the United States' second highest rating mini-series of all time behind Roots; both series were produced by television veteran David L. Wolper.

    The mini-series starred Richard Chamberlain, Rachel Ward, Barbara Stanwyck, Christopher Plummer, Bryan Brown, Mare Winningham, Philip Anglim and Jean Simmons. It was directed by Daryl Duke.

    Set primarily on Drogheda, a fictional sheep station in the Australian outback, the story focuses on the Cleary family and spans the years 1920 to 1962.

    PLEASE READ THE PLOT SUMMARY HERE!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thorn_Birds

    McCullough, Colleen

    NOVELS

    Tim (1974)

    The Thorn Birds (1977)

    An Indecent Obsession (1981)

    A Creed for the Third Millennium (1985)

    The Ladies of Missalonghi (1987)

    The First Man in Rome (1990)

    The Grass Crown (1991)

    Fortune's Favorites (1993)

    Caesar's Women (1996)

    Caesar (1997)

    The Song of Troy (1998)

    Morgan's Run (2000)

    The October Horse (2002)

    The Touch (2003)

    OTHER BOOKS

    Australian Cookbook (1981)

    Cooking With Colleen McCullough and Jean Easthope (1982)

    _____________________________________________________

    Shogun

    Minamoto no Yoritomo, the first shogun of the Kamakura shogunate

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    Minamoto no Yoritomo, the first shogun of the Kamakura shogunate

    For other uses, see Shogun (disambiguation).

    Shogun (將軍, shōgun?) is a military rank and historical title in Japan. The rank is equivalent to "general," a high officer in an army. As a title, it is the short form of sei-i taishōgun (征夷大將軍). The Imperial Court in Kyoto awarded this title first to the leaders of military expeditions against eastern people, and later to the heads of military governments at many times in the history of Japan.

    A shogun's office or administration is a shogunate or bakufu (幕府). The latter literally means "an office in the tent" in Japanese. The tent is symbolic of the role of the military in fighting wars in the field.

    The term sei-i taishōgun means "great general who subdues the eastern barbarians." "Eastern barbarian" is one of several ancient terms for various groups who lived in eastern area and had not yet become subject to the central government. Among them were the aboriginal Ainu people who once inhabited Honshū in addition to Hokkaidō.

    Minamoto no Yoritomo, the first shogun of the Kamakura shogunate, seized considerable power from the aristocracy in Kyoto. He became the practical ruler of Japan, and received the title sei-i taishōgun. Thereafter, the heads of three successive shogunates received the same title. It continued in use until the Meiji Restoration.

    REVIEWS!

    Richly entertaining and easy to read despite its enormous length. The novel follows the exploits of the first Englishman to set foot in Japan John Blackthorne. Bewildered by the exotic complexity, daunting language barrier, and the brutality of his captors, Blackthorne must also face a continuation of the religious struggles that convulsed Europe during that period, an Englishman confronting Catholicism in the person of Jesuit priests and Portuguese colonial forces already settled in Japan. He also finds himself at first unwittingly then whole-heartedly becoming involved in the power struggle as several warlords fight for the title of shogun. Within this byzantine plot of moves and counter-moves, he becomes romantically involved with a Japanese woman serving as his translator. The story carefully weaves in real history and Japanese folklore often with different characters and all with different names than their historic counterparts. For someone familiar with Japanese literature and history, I suspect the results could be disconcerting but for most Americans, they will find the world of Shogun horrifying, captivating, and enchanting. For those who have seen the mini-series, the book will provide significant insight into events. In the film, people speak Japanese but happily in the book, all the Japanese is translated and scenes which are deleted in the film involving only Japanese characters appear fully in the book making the novel much more complete and fulfilling than the mini-series. For those looking for escape, the book is a wonderful indulgence that, if you are not already familiar with historic Japan, should provide terrific entertainment.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I'VE SEEN BOTH OF THESE MOVIES AND THEY ARE TRULY

    EPIC AND GREAT FILMS TO WATCH. RICHARD CHAMBERLIN

    STARED IN BOTH FILMS AND GIVES A MAGNIFICENT PERFORMANCE IN BOTH FILMS. I THINK YOU SHOULD WATCH THEM BOTH TO SEE WHAT I MEAN, ALTHOUGH THEY ARE QUITE LONG, THEY ARE WORTH WATCHING..

    GREAT ACTING BY ALL PARTICIPENTS!!!

    Source(s): THE THORN BIRDS. SHOGUN.
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