Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentLaw & Ethics · 1 decade ago

Does military training render you considered a "deadly weapon" in the eyes of the law?

In the movie 'ConAir', the main character gets involved in a fight to protect his wife, and ends up killing a man. Charged with manslaughter, the judge deems him a 'deadly weapon', due to his prior military training. Because of this, he receives the maximum sentence. Would this classification happen in a real-life courtroom?

10 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    No of course it doesn’t. I haven’t heard that rumor in a long time. There used to be another one where people would tell me that they were black belts and they had to register their hands as deadly weapons with the police office.

    What you are talking about comes from an old court case that is sometimes referenced. In court cases involving violent confrontations, lawyers and judges may advise the jury to bear in mind a person’s martial arts, boxing or military training when evaluating the facts of the case, as in the Matter of the Welfare of DSF, 416 N.W.2d 772 (Minn. App. 1988), where the Minnesota Court of Appeals concluded that the defendant, who had “substantial experience in karate,” was aware enough of the potential of his blows to deliberately break the plaintiff’s jaw. But that is a lot different from legally stating that the person in question is a registered and/or licensed deadly weapon.

  • 5 years ago

    There is nothing factual about that designation. It is always possible that a veteran could go to the left of the right. Extremism isn't limited to veterans. As I read the FBI report that this report supposedly came from; I read that the extremist groups were looking for veterans, not viceversa. They certainly have the training these groups are looking for. But there is no evidence that veterans are gung-ho to bring down the government. They have sacrificed to protect our nation and our government. And the phrase"potential terrorists" sounds like a catch phrase to justify persecution to people who really aren't guilty of anything.

  • 1 decade ago

    well, yes and no.... my dad was a Navy Seal for 25 years, and while he was in the Navy his hands were considered a deadly weapon. But now that he is out, they are not. As far as court goes, possibly if the person was still enlisted in the service but most likely only in military court

  • 6 years ago

    As a current soldier certified in level 3 combatives I can see where we could be considered deadly weapons

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    An ex-military man that has to ask this question is certainly 'Deadly"! 'Deadly Boring'

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No, any punk can be ex-military. I was in the military, I'm only deadly when I'm pissed (but I ain't no punk).

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No, but I do have a license to kill, I meant grill. But if that was the case then Jet Li, Jackie Chan, Chuck Norris, and many others would have to register.

  • 5 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Improve Your Eyesight Naturally - http://improveeyesight.uzaev.com/?nIzX
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Not quite, unless you intentionally abuse your military powers.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    no,and you watch to much TV,come back to reality

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.