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Anonymous asked in Food & DrinkCooking & Recipes · 1 decade ago

When and where did corned beef originate from?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    According to the US department of Agriculture Originally "Corned Beef and Cabbage" was a traditional dish served for Easter Sunday dinner in rural Ireland. The beef, because there was no refrigeration at that time was salted or brined during the winter to preserve it, It was then eaten after the long, meatless Lenten fast.

    However other Irish people feel that Corned Beef and cabbage is about as Irish as Spaghetti and meatballs. That beef was a real delicacy usually served only to the kings.

    According to Bridgett Haggerty of the website Irish Cultres and Customs she says that their research shows that most likely a "bacon joint" or a piece of salted pork boiled with cabbage and potatoes would more likely have shown up for an Easter Sunday feast in the rural parts of Ireland.

    Since the advent of refrigeration, the trend in Ireland is to eat fresh meats. Today this peasant dish is more popular in the United States than in Ireland. Irish-Americans and lots of other people eat it on St. Patrick's Day, Ireland's principal feast day, as a nostalgic reminder of their Irish heritage.

    Corning is a form of curing; it has nothing to do with corn. The name comes from Anglo-Saxon times before refrigeration. In those days, the meat was dry-cured in coarse "corns" of salt. Pellets of salt, some the size of kernels of corn, were rubbed into the beef to keep it from spoiling and to preserve it.

    Today brining -- the use of salt water -- has replaced the dry salt cure, but the name "corned beef" is still used, rather than "brined" or "pickled" beef. Commonly used spices that give corned beef its distinctive flavor are peppercorns and bay leaf. Of course, these spices may vary regionally.

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  • 3 years ago

    Corned Beef And Cabbage History

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  • 1 decade ago

    It is associated with Saint Patrick's Day when Irish Americans eat a traditional meal of corned beef and cabbage. According to the History Channel, while cabbage has long been a traditional food item for the Irish, corned beef serving as a substitute for Irish bacon first became traditional in the late 1800s. Irish immigrants living in New York City's Lower East Side sought an equivalent in taste and texture to their traditional Irish bacon (similar to Canadian bacon), and learned about this cheaper alternative to bacon from their Jewish neighbors. It is worth noting that this is slightly inaccurate as it suggests a universal change of tradition; to be more specific, this applies only to the tradition of Irish Americans. Most native Irish people would be surprised and amused (or possibly appalled) at the suggestion that corned beef and cabbage is a traditional Irish meal.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Corned Beef originated in Ireland as a traditional Easter Sunday feast. It started out with pork or lamb in the rural areas, as the beef was reserved for royalty and the wealthy and cows were used mostly for milk, not eating. It shows up first in the writings from the 1600's.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The term "corned beef" dates to 1621.

    Food historians tell us corned beef (preserving beef with "corns" or large grains of salt) originated in Medieval Europe.

    corned beef has a particular regional association with Cork City. From the late 17th century until 1825, the beef-curing industry was the biggest and most important asset to the city. In this period Cork exported vast quantities of cured beef to Britain, Europe, America, Newfoundland, and the W. Indies. During the Napoleonic wars the British army was supplied principally with corned beef which was cured in and exported from the port of Cork."

    Corned beef was very popular in colonial America because it was an economical and effective way to preserve meat.

    Source(s): Oxford University.
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  • 1 decade ago

    It was a chilly day on March 17, 1821 in Rathanna, Co Carlow. In the two story stone house off of Murphy’s Lane the family of Morgan and Nancy Boyle Kavanagh were gathered. The house was crowded with the family of their oldest surviving child Mary, her husband Thomas Doyle and their children. Morgan and Nancy’s younger children: Morgan, Johanna, Edward and Patrick were all grown but unmarried. They had all attended mass earlier in the day and were anxiously awaiting the traditional meal of corned beef and cabbage the smells of which wafted deliciously from the kitchen.

    Unfortunately, this scene is probably quite correct except for one small detail. Corned beef was not a staple of the Irish diet. More likely, particularly for middle class families, a bacon joint and cabbage would have been the meal for a special day. There were no parades, shamrocks or green beer. It was the feast day of a Saint and was celebrated as such, sans corned beef.

    The story of the connection between corned beef/cabbage, the Irish and St Patrick ’s Day is a convoluted and somewhat unclear one. It appears that this connection was American in origin rather than Irish. Organized St Patrick’s Day parades may have begun sometime around 1845 in the Northeast United States but there is no mention of corned beef connected to these early celebrations.

    There are several theories or perhaps more correctly legends about the emergence of corned beef being associated with the Irish. One which seems to have a ring of authenticity about it asserts that this began occurring after the U. S. Civil War. As we know many thousands of Irish, many newly immigrated to America, fought on both sides. Corned Beef, which by it’s very making is designed to resist spoilage, was one of the staples of the military diet. The story goes on to suggest that many of the poor Irish were thus introduced to this delicacy (for them) and carried this taste back to their homes. Corned Beef being relatively cheap, ultimately became a staple on the tables of the Irish.

    Others assert that Irish immigrants learned to use corned beef as a substitute for bacon from their Jewish neighbours in the tenements of New York City. Another theory is that this taste grew out of a comic book character proclaiming Corned Beef was his favourite Irish meal.

    Whatever the origin Corned Beef and Cabbage is now and forever associated with the Irish and St Patrick’s Day. We can end with a bit of trivia. In the 1983 St Patrick’s Day celebration in Butte, Montana (for those who know it is full of Irish-American history) the revellers consumed 5,000 gallons of beer, 50,000 pounds of corned beef and 26,000 pounds of cabbage. Now that is a celebration!

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  • 5 years ago

    when and where did corned beef originate from?

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  • 1 decade ago

    Ireland

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