How do you do Standard Deviation??

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  • 1 decade ago
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    First find the mean (average). Then subtract each data number from the mean, and square the difference. Add up all these squared differences and find the average of that sum. Then take the square root of that average. That's the standard deviation.

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  • 1 decade ago

    robertspr... and hayharbr are both right. Both of these are correct for different situations.

    You divide by n when you have the entire population. That's just the measure of spread for the population.

    You divide by n-1 when you have a sample, because you're generally using it to estimate the population standard deviation. The n-1 makes it so that, on average, your estimate will be correct.

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  • 1 decade ago

    hayharbr is right except the average is the sum divided by n. For standard deviation you should devide the sum by n-1. The difference is very slight except in very small samples.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Are you in my math class because we're doing the same thing right now! haha

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  • 1 decade ago

    If you have a scientific calendar, it should tell you in the instructions.

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  • 1 decade ago

    There is this formula that you need to write.

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  • 1 decade ago

    wut in the world is that

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