Why do Jehovah's Witnesses exclude other people?

I have a great friend who is a Jehovah's Witness, but we can't do anything outside of school together. She excludes everyone who is a non-believer of her religion, and it hurts me.

I'm Jewish, if that helps.

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  • BJ
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Being Jewish has nothing to do with it.

    Bad associations: If a gang were to tell you that they knew how to get plenty of money without a lot of work, would you go with them? “Do not go in the way with them. Hold back your foot from their roadway. For their feet are those that run to sheer badness, and they keep hastening to shed blood.” (Prov. 1:10-19) If a person is not a worshiper of Jehovah, but he or she does seem to be really nice, would you view him or her as a suitable friend? Shechem was the son of a Caananite chieftain, and the Bible says he was the “most honorable of the whole house of his father,” but he “took [Dinah] and lay down with her and violated her.” (Gen. 34:1, 2, 19) Should the fact that other people may not believe the truths you have learned from God’s Word make a difference to you? “Do not be misled. Bad associations spoil useful habits.” (1 Cor. 15:33) How would Jehovah feel if you chose as your friends those who do not love him? To a king of Judah who did that, Jehovah’s spokesman said: “For this there is indignation against you from the person of Jehovah.”

    What Kind of Friends Are Good?

    Should the fact that her schoolmate was not a worshipper of the true God have made made up name "Beverly" hesitate to cultivate a friendship with her? Granted, true Christians do not assume that a person is indecent or immoral simply because he or she is not a fellow believer. But when it comes to forming close bonds, there is reason to be cautious. The apostle Paul warned those in the first-century Corinthian congregation: “Bad company ruins character.”

    Paul’s words: “Do not become unevenly yoked with unbelievers. For what fellowship do righteousness and lawlessness have? Or what sharing does light have with darkness?” (2 Corinthians 6:14) If we rely on God and are “pure in heart,” we will reject the spirit and life-style of sinners and will have clean motives and desires, along with “faith without hypocrisy.”

    Whom do you choose to associate with? Why is that important? Well, the inspired proverb says: “He that is walking with wise persons will become wise, but he that is having dealings with the stupid ones will fare badly.” (Proverbs 13:20) In other words, eventually we get to be like those with whom we associate, either wise or stupid.

    This does not mean being cold, unfriendly, or rude to youths who are not Jehovah’s Witnesses. The Bible urges us to love our neighbors and to “be peaceable with all men.” (Romans 12:18; Matthew 22:39) However, you may find yourself ‘walking in the counsel’ of those who do not follow Bible standards if you associate too closely with them.

    Source(s): Reasoning from the Scriptures
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It really doesn't matter what you are, the only thing that matters is that you aren't a Jehovah's Witness. Witnesses believe that they need to only associate with other Witnesses aside from work or school. It helps them stay positive I guess to associate themselves with people that have the same beliefs as they do. It is suppose to help them keep clear of situations that would cause them to go against what they believe.

    I hope you can understand what I am trying to say. I know why they do that, I just can't put it into words.

    Source(s): grew up as a Jehovah's Witness
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    JWs are like other high control religions that believe only they will be saved. Anyone else is classified as a worldly person. As a worldly person she must view you with caution. See the following quote.

    Watchtower 1994 Feb 15 p.24

    “We must also be on guard against extended association with worldly people. Perhaps it is a neighbor, a school friend, a workmate, or a business associate. We may reason, ‘He respects the Witnesses, he leads a clean life, and we do talk about the truth occasionally.’ Yet, the experience of others proves that in time we may even find ourselves preferring such worldly company to that of a spiritual brother or sister. What are some of the dangers of such a friendship?”

    You should not feel hurt, but rather sad for her being so blinded by her religion.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Primarily, Jehovah's Witnesses are busy people. They don't have time to do all that!

    In addition to the normal demands on workers and students, Witnesses take their additional responsibilities as Christians seriously. In particular, Witnesses work hard to preach the "good news" to their neighbors.

    (Matthew 24:14) And this good news of the kingdom will be preached in all the inhabited earth for a witness to all the nations

    (Luke 9:6) They went through the territory from village to village, declaring the good news

    (Acts 5:42) Every day in the temple and from house to house they continued without letup teaching and declaring the good news about the Christ, Jesus.

    Of course, it also takes time and effort to prepare for the house-to-house ministry. In addition to that preparation for field service, most Jehovah's Witnesses spend time preparing for and attending their five meetings each week. Four of the meetings have scheduled bible material which the congregation is encouraged to review. Ahead of time, congregation members are often invited to assist in presenting the material at the meeting, so this additional preparation and rehearsal may also place demands on a Witness's time.

    There are also practical matters associated with Jehovah's Witnesses which require time. Every few weeks, each Witness is assigned to assist with cleaning and/or maintenance at his Kingdom Hall. There may be a schedule to assist with the practical needs of the elderly and infirm in the congregation, or a Witness may choose to do so on his own.

    Admittedly, it is true that Jehovah's Witnesses tend to be selective regarding with whom they socialize. They greatly value God's standards of morality and virtue, and reject anything incompatible with their worship, such as nationalism and holidays of pagan origin. Strictly speaking, they view non-Witnesses as "unbelievers", and cannot help but notice the bible instruction:

    (2 Corinthians 6:14,15) Do not become unevenly yoked with unbelievers. ...what portion does a faithful person have with an unbeliever?

    However, each individual and family among Jehovah's Witnesses decides to what extent they will follow that counsel (of course, Ephesians 6:1 clearly says "Children, be obedient to your parents"). The same bible writer also wrote thusly:

    (1 Corinthians 10:27) If anyone of the unbelievers invites you and you wish to go, proceed

    The one activity that almost no Witness could resist is an opportunity to share his understanding of the bible. If a non-Witness wants to expand a friendly relationship with a Jehovah's Witness, that would be an excellent way to do so, and of course there is no commitment involved in simply learning.

    Learn more:

    http://watchtower.org/e/jt/article_04.htm

    http://jw-media.org/people/ministry.htm

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    You have been given some valid reasons, but may I make a suggestion. Go talk to her parents about the two of you doing things together. Lay out for them what those things are and how it is not your intent to influence your friend do anythings not in keeping with the teachings of Christ.

    When I was young, a teacher wanted me to be a stage manager for a Christmas play. Naturally, I told him it was not possible as I was a witness, though not yet baptized because of my age.

    He went to my parents, and an elder, to ask permission. He explained just what I would be doing, and that there would be no public recognition of my participation. They said yes.

    So, make your case. Remember, they do have three meetings a week, plus their field service. Do not try to make an excuse for why it would be okay to miss one of these in order to do something with you. Have respect with their beliefs and you two may be able to do things. Actually, being Jewish, your chances are likely better.

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  • we are not a cult. a cult worships man. we worship Jehovah and Jesus Christ. we are in 235 lands and live in our own homes. bad associations spoil useful habit. this is not saying you are a bad person. she will study the bible with you. you can ask her questions about our religion.

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  • 1 decade ago

    They believe strongly what the the bible says in first Corinthians Bad associations spoil useful habits. not that your bad person its just exposure to false teachings and worldly thinking can corrupt one morality so it is best for them to avoid contact with this. She would probably explain it better if you asked her i have friends who are the same.

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  • Bestie
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Cults usually like to exclude people.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Because they don't participate in so called "world things."

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  • 1 decade ago

    Because it is a cult! Her parents are scared someone will tell her the truth!

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