what this line means "et tu brute"???

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Literally, this means, "And you, Brutus?" with Brutus in the imperitive case. Also, even/also/too is implied making it mean, "And even you Brutus?" with, "would betray me, Caesar, and literally stab me in the back," to follow, of course.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The quote attributed to Caesar is actually:"Et tu, mi fili Brute!"

    which means "You too, my son Brutus"

    And "et" can mean "too" in classical Latin, besides "and"

    In German it sounds nothing like the word for "too", and it's still translated the same way "Auch du, mein Sohn Brutus", and it is used to express regret at the treason(or joining ranks with one's enemies) of a trusted person.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The literal translation is the best "And you, Brutus" said as a question or almost a stantement. "And you, Brutus" as to include Brutus in with those traitors who stabbed him.

    Because of it's sound, "Tu" like "Too" many think that the translation is "You, too, Brutus" but there is nothing which suggests this other than the sound alike words.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    And you, Brute?

    Shakespear :)

    Oh I forget which Shakespear play this was, but Brute dishonoured and betrayed the main character and I think when the main character was dying and found out Brute betrayed him (in addition with a lot of other ppl), the main character said that.

    Oh now I remember! It was from Julius Caeser. Caeser was stabbed by Brutus and Caeser wasn't aware his best friend was in on the murdering of him.

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  • 1 decade ago

    And you too Brutus? Classic line from a play surronding the fall of Caesar. Brutus was his best friend and when everyone turned on him, he thought Brutus would stand tall. But Brutus turned on him too.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    and you (Brutus) - Ceaser to Brutus after he was stabbed. Bad form really as Ceaser had been very kind to Brutus after having been betrayed by him during the Civil War.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    You too Brutus???

    From William Shakespeare's JULIUS CEASAR

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Julius Caesar was dumbfounded to learn that Brutus was also one of his assassans as he had always trusted Brutus.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Its from Shakespear. It is what Ceasar said to Brutus when he was stabbed on the senate floor.

    People say it to mean something like 'I can't believe YOU were in on this too...jerk.'

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  • 1 decade ago

    It can be translated into a few ways: "You too, Brutus?" or "Even you, Brutus" or the word-for-word tranlation: "And you, Brutus?"

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