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History of dengue fever..review of related literature about dengue fever...reason why there is dengue?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Here are some facts on Dengue fever, and I have included the google search, too.

    http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie...

    Dengue

    Dengue [DEN-ghee] is a flu-like viral disease spread by the bite of infected mosquitoes. Dengue hemorrhagic fever is a severe, often fatal, complication of dengue.

    Dengue occurs in most tropical areas of the world. Most U.S. cases occur in travelers returning from abroad, but the dengue risk is increasing for persons living along the Texas-Mexico border and in other parts of the southern United States.

    There is no specific treatment for dengue.

    Prevention centers on avoiding mosquito bites in areas where dengue occurs or might occur and eliminating breeding sites.

    What is dengue fever? What is dengue hemorrhagic fever?

    Dengue fever is a flu-like illness spread by the bite of an infected mosquito.

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever is a severe, often fatal, complication of dengue fever.

    What is the infectious agent that causes dengue?

    Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever are caused by any of the dengue family of viruses. Infection with one virus does not protect a person against infection with another.

    How is dengue spread?

    Dengue is spread by the bite of an Aedes mosquito. The mosquito transmits the disease by biting an infected person and then biting someone else.

    Where is dengue found?

    Dengue viruses occur in most tropical areas of the world. Dengue is common in Africa, Asia, the Pacific, Australia, and the Americas. It is widespread in the Caribbean basin. Dengue is most common in cities but can be found in rural areas. It is rarely found in mountainous areas above 4,000 feet.

    The mosquitoes that transmit dengue live among humans and breed in discarded tires, flower pots, old oil drums, and water storage containers close to human dwellings. Unlike the mosquitoes that cause malaria, dengue mosquitoes bite during the day.

    What are the signs and symptoms of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever?

    Dengue fever usually starts suddenly with a high fever, rash, severe headache, pain behind the eyes, and muscle and joint pain. The severity of the joint pain has given dengue the name "breakbone fever." Nausea, vomiting, and loss of appetite are common. A rash usually appears 3 to 4 days after the start of the fever. The illness can last up to 10 days, but complete recovery can take as long as a month. Older children and adults are usually sicker than young children.

    Most dengue infections result in relatively mild illness, but some can progress to dengue hemorrhagic fever. With dengue hemorrhagic fever, the blood vessels start to leak and cause bleeding from the nose, mouth, and gums. Bruising can be a sign of bleeding inside the body. Without prompt treatment, the blood vessels can collapse, causing shock (dengue shock syndrome). Dengue hemorrhagic fever is fatal in about 5 percent of cases, mostly among children and young adults.

    How soon after exposure do symptoms appear?

    The time between the bite of a mosquito carrying dengue virus and the start of symptoms averages 4 to 6 days, with a range of 3 to 14 days. An infected person cannot spread the infection to other persons but can be a source of dengue virus for mosquitoes for about 6 days.

    How is dengue diagnosed?

    Dengue is diagnosed by a blood test.

    Who is at risk for dengue?

    Anyone who is bitten by an infected mosquito can get dengue fever. Risk factors for dengue hemorrhagic fever include a person's age and immune status, as well as the type of infecting virus. Persons who were previously infected with one or more types of dengue virus are thought to be at greater risk for developing dengue hemorrhagic fever if infected again.

    What is the treatment for dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever?

    There is no specific treatment for dengue. Persons with dengue fever should rest and drink plenty of fluids. They should be kept away from mosquitoes for the protection of others. Dengue hemorrhagic fever is treated by replacing lost fluids. Some patients need transfusions to control bleeding.

    How common is dengue?

    In tropical countries around the world, dengue is one of the most common viral diseases spread to humans by mosquitoes. Tens of millions of cases of dengue fever and up to hundreds of thousands of cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever occur each year.

    In the United States, approximately 100 cases of dengue are reported each year in travelers returning from tropical areas. Many more cases probably go unreported. A few persons have become infected with dengue while living in the United States. Aedes mosquitoes are found in Texas, Florida, and other southern states, and locally acquired dengue has been reported three times since 1980 in southern Texas.

    Is dengue an emerging infectious disease?

    Yes. All types of dengue virus are re-emerging worldwide and causing larger and more frequent epidemics, especially in cities in the tropics. The emergence of dengue as a major public health problem has been most dramatic in the western hemisphere. Dengue fever has reached epidemic levels in Central America and is threatening the United States.

    Several factors are contributing to the resurgence of dengue fever:

    No effective mosquito control efforts are underway in most countries with dengue.

    Public health systems to detect and control epidemics are deteriorating around the world.

    Rapid growth of cities in tropical countries has led to overcrowding, urban decay, and substandard sanitation, allowing more mosquitoes to live closer to more people.

    The increase in non-biodegradable plastic packaging and discarded tires is creating new breeding sites for mosquitoes.

    Increased jet air travel is helping people infected with dengue viruses to move easily from city to city.

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever is also on the rise. Persons who have been infected with one or more forms of dengue virus are at greater risk for the more severe disease. With the increase in all types of virus, the occurrence of dengue hemorrhagic fever becomes more likely.

    How can dengue be prevented?

    There is no vaccine to prevent dengue. Prevention centers on avoiding mosquito bites when traveling to areas where dengue occurs and when in U.S. areas, especially along the Texas-Mexico border, where dengue might occur. Eliminating mosquito breeding sites in these areas is another key prevention measure.

    Avoid mosquito bites when traveling in tropical areas:

    Use mosquito repellents on skin and clothing.

    When outdoors during times that mosquitoes are biting, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants tucked into socks.

    Avoid heavily populated residential areas.

    When indoors, stay in air-conditioned or screened areas. Use bednets if sleeping areas are not screened or air-conditioned.

    If you have symptoms of dengue, report your travel history to your doctor.

    Eliminate mosquito breeding sites in areas where dengue might occur:

    Eliminate mosquito breeding sites around homes. Discard items that can collect rain or run-off water, especially old tires.

    Regularly change the water in outdoor bird baths and pet and animal water containers.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Dengue is a flu-like viral disease spread by the bite of infected mosquitoes. Dengue hemorrhagic fever is a severe, often fatal, complication of dengue.Dengue is spread by the bite of an Aedes mosquito.Dengue fever usually starts suddenly with a high fever, rash, severe headache, pain behind the eyes, and muscle and joint pain. The severity of the joint pain has given dengue the name "breakbone fever." Nausea, vomiting, and loss of appetite are common. A rash usually appears 3 to 4 days after the start of the fever. The illness can last up to 10 days, but complete recovery can take as long as a month. Older children and adults are usually sicker than young children. Most dengue infections result in relatively mild illness, but some can progress to dengue hemorrhagic fever. With dengue hemorrhagic fever, the blood vessels start to leak and cause bleeding from the nose, mouth, and gums. Bruising can be a sign of bleeding inside the body. Without prompt treatment, the blood vessels can collapse, causing shock (dengue shock syndrome). Dengue hemorrhagic fever is fatal in about 5 percent of cases, mostly among children and young adults.There is no specific treatment for dengue. Persons with dengue fever should rest and drink plenty of fluids. They should be kept away from mosquitoes for the protection of others. Dengue hemorrhagic fever is treated by replacing lost fluids. Some patients need transfusions to control bleeding.There is no vaccine to prevent dengue. Prevention centers on avoiding mosquito bites when traveling to areas where dengue occurs .

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    History

    The term "dengue" is a Spanish attempt at the Swahili phrase "ki denga pepo", meaning "cramp-like seizure caused by an evil spirit". It emerged during a Caribbean outbreak in 1827-1828.

    Outbreaks resembling dengue fever have been reported throughout history. The first case report dates back from 1789 and is attributed to Benjamin Rush, who coined the term "breakbone fever" (because of the symptoms of myalgia and arthralgia). The viral etiology and the transmission by mosquitoes were only deciphered in the 20th century. The socioeconomic impact of World War II resulted in increased spread globally.

    more:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dengue_fever

  • 1 decade ago

    Dengue fever is an infectious disease carried by mosquitoes and caused by any of four related dengue viruses. This disease used to be called "break-bone" fever because it sometimes causes severe joint and muscle pain that feels like bones are breaking, hence the name. Health experts have known about dengue fever for more than 200 years.

    Dengue fever is found mostly during and shortly after the rainy season in tropical and subtropical areas of

    Africa

    Southeast Asia and China

    India

    Middle East

    Caribbean and Central and South America

    Australia and the South and Central Pacific

    An epidemic in Hawaii in 2001 is a reminder that many states in the United States are susceptible to dengue epidemics because they harbor the particular types of mosquitoes that transmit it.

    Worldwide, more than 100 million cases of dengue infection occur each year. This includes 100 to 200 cases reported annually to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), mostly in people who have recently traveled abroad. Many more cases likely go unreported because some health care providers do not recognize the disease.

    During the last part of the 20th century, many tropical regions of the world saw an increase in dengue cases. Epidemics also occurred more frequently and with more severity. In addition to typical dengue, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome also have increased in many parts of the world.

    Symptoms of typical uncomplicated (classic) dengue usually start with fever within 5 to 6 days after you have been bitten by an infected mosquito and include

    High fever, up to 105 degrees Fahrenheit

    Severe headache

    Retro-orbital (behind the eye) pain

    Severe joint and muscle pain

    Nausea and vomiting

    Rash

    The rash may appear over most of your body 3 to 4 days after the fever begins. You may get a second rash later in the disease.

    Symptoms of dengue hemorrhagic fever include all of the symptoms of classic dengue plus

    Marked damage to blood and lymph vessels

    Bleeding from the nose, gums, or under the skin, causing purplish bruises

    This form of dengue disease can cause death.

    Symptoms of dengue shock syndrome--the most severe form of dengue disease--include all of the symptoms of classic dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever, plus

    Fluids leaking outside of blood vessels

    Massive bleeding

    Shock (very low blood pressure)

    Diagnosis

    Your health care provider can diagnose dengue fever by doing two blood tests, 2 to 3 weeks apart. The tests can show whether a sample of your blood contains antibodies to the virus. In epidemics, a health care provider often can diagnose dengue by typical signs and symptoms.

    Treatment

    There is no specific treatment for classic dengue fever, and like most people you will recover completely within 2 weeks. To help with recovery, health care experts recommend

    Getting plenty of bed rest

    Drinking lots of fluids

    Taking medicine to reduce fever

    CDC advises people with dengue fever not to take aspirin. Acetaminophen or other over-the-counter pain-reducing medicines are safe for most people.

    For severe dengue symptoms, including shock and coma, early and aggressive emergency treatment with fluid and electrolyte replacement can be lifesaving.

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