Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceHomework Help · 1 decade ago

what year did child labor end in america?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    The Child Labor Amendment was, and remains, a proposed—and technically still-pending—amendment to the United States Constitution offered by Republican Ohio Congressman Israel Moore Foster during the 68th Congress in the form of House Joint Resolution No. 184.

    House Joint Resolution No. 184 was adopted by the United States House of Representatives on April 26, 1924, with a vote of 297 yeas, 69 nays, 2 "present" and 64 not voting (65 Congressional Record 7294-7295). It was then adopted by the Senate on June 2, 1924, with a vote of 61 yeas, 23 nays and 12 not voting (65 Congressional Record 10142). And with that, the proposed constitutional amendment was submitted to the state legislatures for ratification pursuant to Article V of the Constitution.

    Actions in the state legislatures

    The Child Labor Amendment has been ratified by the legislatures of the following 28 states:

    Arkansas in 1924; Arizona, California and Wisconsin all in 1925; Montana in 1927; Colorado in 1931; Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Washington and West Virginia all in 1933; Idaho, Indiana, Utah and Wyoming all in 1935; Kentucky in 1936; and Kansas, Nevada and New Mexico all in 1937.

    In 1929, the Nebraska Senate voted to ratify the Child Labor Amendment, but the Legislature's lower house did not (the Nebraska Legislature had not yet become unicameral); the Mississippi Senate voted to ratify the measure in 1934, but the state's House of Representatives did not; and in 1937, the New York Senate voted to ratify it, but the state's Assembly did not.

    Although the act, on the part of state legislatures, of "rejecting" a proposed constitutional amendment has no legal recognition, such action does have political ramifications. The Child Labor Amendment was rejected—and not subsequently ratified—by lawmakers in North Carolina in 1924; by those in Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, Missouri, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Vermont all in 1925; by those in Virginia in 1926; and by those in Maryland in 1927. In the specific case of Louisiana, its legislators thrice rejected the Child Labor Amendment—first in 1924, again a decade later 1934, and a third time in 1936.

    Today, with 50 states in the Union, the ratifications of 10 additional states would be required to incorporate the proposed Child Labor Amendment into the Federal Constitution.

    [edit] Judicial history

    If ever ratified by the required number of America's state legislatures, the Child Labor Amendment would repose in the Congress of the United States supreme jurisdiction to legislate on the subject of child labor. The states would have to yield to federal law—which is normal procedure anyway. After several state legislatures initially balked at the proposal during the 1920s, a number of them re-examined it during the 1930s and decided to ratify it. Those delayed actions resulted in much controversy and spawned the 1939 decision of the United States Supreme Court in the landmark case of Coleman v. Miller (307 U.S. 433) in which it was determined that the Child Labor Amendment remains pending business before the state legislatures because the 68th Congress never specified a deadline within which the state legislatures must act upon the Child Labor Amendment. The Coleman v. Miller ruling formed the basis of the unusual, belated ratification of the 27th Amendment which was proposed by Congress in 1789 and ratified more than two centuries later in 1992 by the legislatures of at least three-fourths of the 50 states.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The National Child Labor Committee, an organization dedicated to the abolition of all child labor, was formed in 1904. It managed to pass one law, which was struck down by the Supreme Court two years later for violating a child's right to contract his work. In 1924, Congress attempted to pass a constitutional amendment that would authorize a national child labor law. This measure was blocked, and the bill was eventually dropped. It took the Great Depression to end child labor nationwide; adults had become so desperate for jobs that they would work for the same wage as children. In 1938, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Fair Labor Standards Act which, amongst other things, placed limits on many forms of child labor.

    Source(s): wikipedia
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Around the end of the Industrial Revolution. Somewhere around the early 1900s.

    http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/hine-pho...

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  • tang
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Factories have been the place they have been greater often than not. additionally mines (coal and iron) chimney sweeps merchandising newspapers family members servants gas works shipyards tournament factories nail factories some have been fortunate sufficient to be apprenticed to shape

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    where in America ,it still thrives in Mexico,central and South America

    it is all called America.

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  • 1 decade ago

    it ended?????? Then why do kids do chores?????? and get paid for it

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