babu asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 1 decade ago

minimum current for a human to get a shock?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    The threshold current to feel an electrical shock on human skin is in the range of one to twenty thousandths of an ampere or 1 - 20 mA. Contrast this with the current drawn by a 100 watt light bulb, about 1000 mA or 1 A.

    The voltage required to produce a "shock sensation" varies, depending on the dry or moist nature of the skin contacted. Dry skin requires more voltage to reach the threshold level of shock sensation.

    Many years ago it was fairly common practice to "taste" electricity from a 1.5 volt dry cell as a "demonstration of electricity." I doubt this is encouraged today, but I have experienced that sensation by holding my thumb against one end of the cell and pressing the other end lightly to my tongue, ostensibly to determine whether the cell is any good. That worked okay for me until one day I tried to test a 9 volt transistor radio battery by touching both electrodes (that's what the little button and cup on the battery is called) to my tongue. Ouch! I received a very painful shock. After that I used a voltmeter to check batteries.

    Also many years ago, there was a popular device installed in roller skating rinks, bars, and other public places to "test your strength" by grasping two vertical metal handles that were connected to an induction coil, a device for producing high voltage electricity. As one of the handles was rotated the voltage increased, the object being to rotate the handle all the way to its mechanical stop without having to let go. Such devices are extremely dangerous because the current passes through both hands and the chest, possibly inducing a fatal fibrillation in the heart muscle.

    It is best to be extremely careful not to get shocked in the first place. Even very small currents, if they pass through the heart, can be fatal. That is why it is common practice for those who work with "live" circuits to always do so with only one hand, keeping the other hand in a pocket to avoid making a complete circuit through the body.

  • 1 decade ago

    I assume you mean a fatal shock.

    Many factors,skin condition,grounding of your body.

    But generally for a human about 50 milliamps at 50 volts would be enough to do you in.

    Some people survive massive jolts,but that is just the luck of the draw.

    It is the current that kills you. So under 50 ma should leave you safe.

    But do not put it to the test!!

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It is voltage dependent. Higher voltage requires lower amperage, and vice versa. 50kV @ micro Amps can be felt.( such as a piezoelectric crystal in a bbq starter)

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Because the story about high frequency shocks not hurting isn't true.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    i volt or 1 amp will do it

  • 1 decade ago

    0.2 Amp is enough to produce fibrilization in heart...

  • 1 decade ago

    i dunno, but 500 volts will do it well and 5000 real quick, but 50000 is painless and instant

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    6v on tongue

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