Doctor's receptionist gives "treatments"..is this okay???

Hi,

Asked this before, but I think I worded it wrong, so I'll try again. My doctor's receptionist does a lot of "extras" in the office. She is not a nurse, nor has she had any medical schooling at all (according to her). She gives flu shots, freezes and removes moles and skin tags, hands out prescription samples (not under doc's recommendations)...These are things I've seen firsthand.

I'm a little worried and am thinking of switching doctors because I'd rather have a qualified nurse or at least someone who has taken a course or two.

Is a receptionist allowed to do these things? I never thought they were but.....who knows.

Thanks for answering, I appreciate it.

No joke or rude answers please...thanks so much.

Update:

Note to Joey K...Kay is NOT an idiot and I'm really ticked that you would say that to someone who is trying to help me.

Also, this woman IS a receptionist...how do I know this?? She has told me that she has no certificates whatsoever...after I asked her if she was a nurse.

Would the doctor risk his license....I have no idea why he would let her do these things, outside of the fact that it is a busy office and she is the only one working with him.

As a patient, I want the best care, and not from someone who never set foot in a school for any training.

Plus, what about the people that DO have the training. Isn't she taking away a job from them??

So Joey, thanks for the input, but as it turns out...YOU are the idiot.

20 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I work in a medical office.....and the answer is...NO she can not diagnose or treat patients. Now....saying that....as front office staff, we answer the phone and schedule patients....triage is part of our job, and we are trained for this....triaging does not mean we are diagnosing....or treating a patient...but we are to come to a conclusion based on what the patient is reporting to us when seeking medical attention. There are red flags that signal us on if a patient HAS to be seen that day....that hour...tomarrow...3 days..or weeks out. If we have any doubt at all on what the process should be, then we ask a doctor or nurse that is on duty. We also are trianed to advise patients on how to treat themselves until they come in for an appointment....such as over the counter meds and ice pack ect. But we always offer an appointment with a trained medical professional at the appropriate time. It is the RESPONSIBILITY of every one that works in our office to put the medical needs of our patients first....even if it is not conveiniant or good financially for our practice. Trust me...we work many very late nights to accommidate our patients. If front office staff is doing medical procedures, writing scripts, ect. you need to calll the office administrator immeadiatly...and inform your doctor of what this person is doing. If they are not able to provide proof to you that this person is legally performing these duties then I would suggest that you speak with a lawyer..because that is very dangerous.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I'm not sure that you particularly need a trained nurse to give "shots" as in the hospital settings we give people education to give injections. Diabetics inject themselves with insulin and take their own blood sugar tests. We train partners of patients to give injections at home for people who have conditions that can be managed at home with some injections.

    I've never seen anyone unqualified freezing and removing moles or skin tags unless they were in training of some sort. I think it is dodgy for anyone to hand out prescription samples unless instructed to do so by a doctor or a pharmacist.

    In my own experience, in various practices I have seen, the reception staff can often have nursing backgrounds (doctors think it's a bit of a bonus if they hire someone who can type, answer phones AND spell "metacarpophalangeal joint" or whatever) so you might actually ask the receptionist if she has done any nursing training (or might be a medical student or whatever). Many people with a little bit of common sense can do some things like apply dressings, remove stitches or staples etc.

    As a medical student, I have removed skin cancers from patients in an outpatient surgical setting under the direction of the treating doctor.

    I don't have a problem with a properly trained non-accredited person giving injections, so long as they are properly trained.

    I would have issues with someone non-medical/non-pharmacy doing the rest of the stuff you mention.

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  • Lisa
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    No amount of smoking is safe. With every cig you smoke, your baby is also getting the toxins. If your baby were born, in your arms today, would you blow smoke directly into it's face? Quitting cold turkey will NOT harm your baby. People use that excuse so they don't have to do it. Not only is quitting cold turkey safe, it's one of the best things you can do for yourself and your baby while you're pregnant. As soon as you give up your cigarettes, your baby will start getting more oxygen, and the risk of miscarriage, premature birth, and other complications will drop. Quitting cold turkey can be difficult, especially if you're a heavy smoker. As your body adjusts to life without nicotine, you'll probably feel restless and irritable. The good news is that your baby won't share in the misery. There's no evidence that babies go through nicotine withdrawal, and they certainly won't miss a daily dose of tar and carbon monoxide. Besides, your withdrawal symptoms will fade in two or three weeks, and then you can finally stop thinking about cigarettes and start thinking about getting the baby's room ready. LOL @ thumbs down. Whoever did that show me PROOF that quitting cold turkey is harmful to an unborn baby. I don't care what anyone says. Smoking while pregnant IS selfish now. Now we know things we didn't know 20 years ago. You wouldn't let your one year old light up a smoke...why? because it is harmful. But is okay to smoke when it is known that your unborn baby is effected by smoking? The reason is because it is "you" that is wanting the smoke. So people that smoke make up excuses making it more okay for them to continue to do so.

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  • 6 years ago

    it depends, on the province and if the doctor is present in the office or not. Check each province's Medical Association. Here in Saskatchewan a office staff member CAN do some procedures - even give shots - - -

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  • soobee
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    frist of all, where are you? different jurisdictions have different laws.

    here in Ontario, it would highly illegal for this person to carry on as she does without formal training as a medical technician, at best. as a college student, I was employed in a doctor's office during the summer to do many of the minor things you've listed, but certainly no minor surgery (removal of tags, eg,) or handing out of even over the counter meds; who knows what they're already taking and combinations and side-effects.etc.

    i would report this matter to the local medical authorities (in ontario we have a body of doctors/lawyers who form procedure law and enforce compliance. I would recommend highly that you put your concerns in writing and send a copy to the doctor, the receptionist and your areas authorities. I definitely would not continue to use their services.

    do you know what kind of training this person has?

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  • 1 decade ago

    A reception is is not "allowed", though apparently in that office the doctor lets her. I believe that should at least be a licensed medical assistant or nurse of some sort.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    First of all, Kay is an idiot. How do you know that this lady is only a receptionist - she could be waiting to be licensed as a medical professsional? She is most likely working under the supervision of the doctor- no doctor is going to risk their license over something as transparent as that.

    There is no reason to switch doctors, and to confirm that, ask them, and I'm sure they will give you a comforting answer.

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  • 1 decade ago

    No, receptionists are not allowed to do these things. Only licensed LVNs, RNs, CNAs, etc are allowed to give shots, etc. You need to say something to the physician because he is the one in jeopardy of loosing his license. If that doesn't work, file a complaint with the police department and they can get involved with the Board of Medicine to have her removed.

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  • 1 decade ago

    im in school for medical assistance and from what i have learned its agianst the law for anyone to give out any information to a patien if its not the doctor! so yes i will change because you really should not take a risk for an un licensed person and yes u can file a law suite for that!!! and the doctor will be out of business!

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  • 1 decade ago

    If this woman has no medical background and is not licensed in any medical field than the doctor who is allowing this needs his license revoked. This receptionist needs to be brought up on charges of fraud.

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