majoring in Biochemistry/Chemistry or Biology/Chemistry. What kinds of things can I do to choose which one?

I am about equally well at Chemistry and Biology and I am very good at Calculus. No exposure to physics. My main academic interests are immunology emerging infectious diseases and genetics. My number one driving force for becoming a doctor is because my mom died of leukemia so i am interested in leukemia, aml in particular. I just want to know like the difference btw the two or what classes can i take to make the distinction btw biochem and bio with a double major in chem very obvious to me....cuz now its like they are exact same

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Couldn't tell from your question if you're a definite on going to med school or not. If you are, then concentrate on the bio -easier for your GPA and you won't use anything from undergrad anyways. But, since you're good at math and chem, you might think about research. You can work toward being a biochemist. Plenty of opportunities in research hospitals. Maybe try some undergrad research and see how you like being in the lab. You won't find that out from the course labs. I'm sure the course curriculum between the two double majors is similar so don't worry about it right now. Get through the introductory courses and decide then. You won't start figuring out what you like until later anyways. Keep your GPA up and things will fall in to place.

    Source(s): I'm a chemist, B.S. Biochemistry
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  • 1 decade ago

    hmmm... If I were to choose, I will go for double major in Biology and Chemistry. If there's a double major for Biology and Biochemistry - better. You don't need indepth Inorganic Chemistry and Physical Chemistry if you want immunology/infectious diseases/genetics. You would want Zoology, Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Genetics, and Biotechnology courses.

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  • 1 decade ago

    If your great at chem and cal. great. To be a well rounded (hands on doc.) keep taking the bio's. Plenty, of them to keep you busy. It looks great academically. But if your going to be more behind the scene(lab. doc) with research, then chem maybe be the way to go. I personally hate chem, and lets not get started on the Geo's, but they want a few classes in everything, so you really can't go wrong academically with taking a variety. Looks like your headed on the right track. You should get into some physics classes.

    Just think about this for med school: they look for well rounded students who have taken many different sciences but a strong track in something(bio, chem,etc). Then the GPA comes into play, if it's high your in, if not you'll be taking pre req's for a year. May I suggest going to 2 schools, take your classes your not so good at a community school, this way it can never hurt your GPA-they just carry over to the university as credit. Good luck, sorry about your mother, sometimes it takes a terrible loss to produce some of the worlds best physicians. My trac. will be HIV. Who knows, maybe we can make a difference someday

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  • 1 decade ago

    It depends on if you like proteins or DNA/RNA. If you like working with proteins, then try biochemistry, if you like DNA and RNA try Biology/Chemistry or molecular biology. It also depends on what type of doctor you want to be a PhD/MD, a PhD, or and MD. Find out what the grad students are doing on campus and ask them about their research. That will give you a better idea of what each major is like at your school. Primarily you want to get as much lab experience as possible, so take all the lab classes you can even if they are not required and try to do an undergraduate research project. In the end if you have the experience in the lab, it will lead you to what you want to do.

    I have a B.S in biotechnology and I am a grad student in molecular biology.

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  • Amy F
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    A double major would probably mean more classes, but by the same token, a better education. Check your school's requirements for each degree to find out how many extra classes you'd take as a double major as opposed to a biochem major, then consider whether you think you'd get anything useful out of those classes. Also, consider minoring in whatever you decide not to major in if your school allows it.

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  • 1 decade ago

    well...take organic chemistry and you'll probably have a better idea if you want to major in either biochemistry, chemistry or biology....biochemistry uses some knowledge you'll learn from organic chemistry...and some people notice that even though they're pretty good at inorganic chemistry/general chemistry, they have a hard time with organic chemistry...also, you'll definitely need physics for either major you choose...if you do decide to major in chemistry, you'll need physics for physical chemistry....my major is chemistry so I had to figure out all this information too! good luck!

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  • Paige
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    I just happily told my exercise trainer that I lost 4 & a half pounds. Of course, that is after going out of town and gaining 3, lol! But, at least I am heading in the right direction.

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  • 1 decade ago

    You may want to consider Biomedical Engineering. This field will use your skills from math, chemistry and biology and belnd it into something that is close to medical field.

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