Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureMythology & Folklore · 1 decade ago

Finnish mythology?

Does anyone know the best sources I could look to in finding out about Finnish mythology and paganism in detail? I'm basically confused the most about how to find the most accurate translations of the Kalevala. I also know there is little I can do short of simply living there to really know how the culture views these old beliefs at present.

Any suggestions or books, websites, authors, videos, etc would be hugely appreciated.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
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    Oh stop talking about "not willing to share" when you obviously don't know what you are talking about in the first place.

    John Martin Crawfords English translation (1888) of Kalevala can be found at least from four sites online:

    http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/5186 ,

    http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/kveng/ ,

    http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Kalevala ,

    and an illustrated version of the same translation can be found from http://altreligion.about.com/library/texts/kaleval... .

    There exists also at least 4 other full translations in English, but a fast search didn't show any of them online. So I guess this first one is most used (don't know about the most accurate). But if you want to search those real books, then their titles, authors and ISBNs are:

    * The Kalevala: The Epic Poem of Finland, translations by John Martin Crawford, ISBN 0-7661-8938-4

    * The Kalevala: Or the Land of Heroes, translations by William Forsell Kirby, ISBN 1-85810-198-0

    * The Kalevala: Or Poems of the Kaleva District, translations by Francis Peabody Magoun, ISBN 0-674-50010-5

    * The Kalevala: Epic of the Finnish People, translations by Eino Friberg, Björn Landström, George C. Schoolfield, ISBN 951-1-10137-4

    * The Kalevala: Or the Land of Heroes, translations by Keith Bosley, foreword by Albert B. Lord (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990), ISBN 0-19-283570-X

    , the first being the one found online. More info about the differences of these translations can be found for example from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalevala#Translations . From that same wikipedia page you can also start to look for other online resources about Kalevala.

    One article about Kalevala in present day can be found in english from http://www2.hs.fi/english/archive/thisweek/4604199... . That's my personal favourite, because I'm a Donald Duck fan ;) About how the Finnish culture nowadays views these old beliefs... Well, we're not pagans anymore. Haven't seen anyone worshipping old gods for ages :)

    About videos: it's not about history but fantasy, however it's strongly tied in Kalevala: a new Finnish-Chinese movie Jadesoturi ( http://www.jadesoturi.net/ , http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0416871/). If you can see that somewhere, you could find it interesting. I as a Finn thought it was... well, bizarre, but a foreign viewer could find it more entertaining.

    About other books: you shouldn't forget Kanteletar, also by Elias Lönnrot ( http://virtual.finland.fi/netcomm/news/showarticle... ). Translations should also be quite well available... I hope. (The Kanteletar, translated by Keith Bosley (Oxford University Press paperback, 1992)).

    About websites... You may have noticed that I'm a big fan of wikipedia. There are two sections besides Kalevala,

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_mythology and

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_paganism ,

    where you can at least find some keywords for your search queries. Wikipedia has its downsides, but it's a good place to start if you can handle critical reading (and you should if you search anything from the web). Good luck in your search, I hope you found these useful, and maybe some day you'll come here to live and see what our culture is like today :)

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    That will be hard to find as they are a reclusive nation not willing to share with outsiders or even among themselves.

    Your best bet would be to start out with Scandinavian Myths as that is were they live.

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