which group sing for the first time the song Guantanamera.?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    The music for the song is regularly attributed to José Fernández Díaz (also known by the diminutive, Joseíto), who claimed to have written at various dates (consensus puts 1929 as its year of origin), and who used it regularly in one of his radio programs. Some researchers claim that the song's structure actually came from music already in popular use by peasants in southeastern Cuba during the early 20th century, and that Fernández merely adopted the melody as his own. There is also some debate on whether the writer of the music used in the chorus of the song, pianist Herminio "El Diablo" García Wilson, could be credited as a co-composer. García's heirs took the matter to court decades later; Cuba's Supreme Court credited Fernández as the sole composer of the music in 1993. Regardless of either claim, Fernández can be safely claimed as being the first public promoter of the song, through his radio programs.

    The original lyrics to the song, as written by Fernández, relate to a particular woman from Guantánamo that Fernández befriended, with whom he had a romantic relationship—if the lyrics are to be believed—and who eventually left him. The alleged real story behind these lyrics (or at least one of many versions of the song's origin that Fernández suggested during his lifetime) is that she did have a romantic interest in him, but merely a platonic one. If the details are to be believed, she had brought him a steak sandwich one day as a present to the radio station he worked at, he stared at some other woman (and made a pass at her) while eating the sandwich, and his friend yanked it out of his hands in disgust, cursed him and left. He never saw her again. These words are rarely sung today.

    The history behind the chorus and its lyrics ("Guantanamera.../Guajira Guantanamera...") is quite similar to this one: García was at a street corner with a group of friends, and made a corteous pass (a "piropo", in Spanish) to a woman (who also happened to be from Guantánamo) who walked by the group, and who answered back rather harshly, offended by the pass. Stunned, he could not take his mind off her reaction while his friends made fun of him; later that day, sitting at a piano with his friends next to him, he wrote the song's main refrain.

    Given the song's musical structure, which fits A-B-A-B (sometimes A-B-B-A) octosyllabic verses, the Guantanamera lent itself from the beginning to impromptu verses, improvised on the spot, similar to what happens with the Mexican folk classic, "La Bamba". Fernández's first use of the song was precisely this; he would comment on daily events on his radio program by adapting them to the song's melody, and then using the song as a show closer. Through this use, the Guantanamera became a popular vehicle for romantic, patriotic, humorous, or social commentary lyrics, in Cuba and elsewhere in the Spanish speaking world.

    The song has been performed by numerous individuals and groups. Cubans such as Celia Cruz and Dámaso Pérez Prado brought the song to the North American mainland, although many in the United States first heard the song performed by 1960s folk singers such as Pete Seeger, the Weavers and Joan Baez. The song was a hit for The Sandpipers in 1967. The Latin jazz bandleader Tito Puente has also recorded a version. It has been performed by jazz musicians such as the Paul Winter Consort, as well as by easy listening artists 101 Strings Orchestra. Other versions include ones by Los Lobos, Jose Feliciano, Julio Iglesias, a dancehall rendition by Yellowman, an instrumental version by the Ventures, a 'Back to the roots' rendition by former Soft Machine drummer Robert Wyatt, and French versions by Joe Dassin and Nana Mouskouri. Hip hop musician Wyclef Jean made a remix of the song in 1997.

    At the concert in Havana on the 12th of August 2006, to mark the 80th birthday of Fidel Castro the next day, the closing item was a version of Guantanamera with verses referring to Castro, sung by a group comprising members of Bamboleo, Pedro Calvo and various others.

  • 1 decade ago

    From Wikipedia:

    The music for the song is regularly attributed[1] to José Fernández Díaz (also known by the diminutive, Joseíto), who claimed to have written at various dates (consensus puts 1929 as its year of origin), and who used it regularly in one of his radio programs. Some researchers claim that the song's structure actually came from music already in popular use by peasants in southeastern Cuba during the early 20th century, and that Fernández merely adopted the melody as his own. There is also some debate on whether the writer of the music used in the chorus of the song, pianist Herminio "El Diablo" García Wilson, could be credited as a co-composer. García's heirs took the matter to court decades later; Cuba's Supreme Court credited Fernández as the sole composer of the music in 1993. Regardless of either claim, Fernández can be safely claimed as being the first public promoter of the song, through his radio programs[2].

  • 4 years ago

    Les Paul And Mary Ford

  • 1 decade ago

    Celia Cruz

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  • 1 decade ago

    Celia Cruz

  • 1 decade ago

    In the US, Sergio Mendez and Brazil.

  • 1 decade ago

    Lots of people have recorded it - google for your answer

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    That would be the lady that sings MAMA, MAMA, MAMA YA NO QUERO!!

  • jdc591
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Sorry, I don't know.

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