how did wisconsin become a state?

i am doining a state report and i got wisconsin.i need to find important monuments,and the main source of income of wisconsin and info about the resource.and how it became a state.do u know?do u know a website?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Wisconsin (IPA pronunciation: [wɪs.ˈkɑn.sn̩] (help·info)) is a state in the United States, located in the Midwest. Its capital is Madison; the governor is Jim Doyle.

    The Wisconsin area, bordered by the current-day states of Iowa, Minnesota, Michigan and Illinois, as well as Lakes Michigan and Superior, has been part of United States territory since the end of the American Revolution; the Wisconsin Territory (which included parts of other current states) was formed on July 3, 1836. Wisconsin ratified its constitution March 13, 1848 and was admitted to the Union on May 29, 1848 as the thirtieth state.

    Wisconsin's rural economy was originally based on furs; in the 19th century, emphasis shifted to mining, lumber, farming, dairy, and tourism. Large-scale industrialization began in the late 19th century in the southeast of the state, with the city of Milwaukee as its major center. In recent decades, service industries, especially medicine and education, have become dominant. Wisconsin's landscape, largely shaped by the Wisconsin glaciation of the last Ice Age, makes the state popular for both tourism and many forms of outdoor recreation.

    Since its founding, Wisconsin has been ethnically heterogeneous, with New Englanders being among the first to arrive; for many years they dominated the state's industry, finance, politics and education. Large numbers of European immigrants followed them, including Germans, mostly between 1850 and 1900, Scandinavians and smaller groups of Belgians, Swiss, Finns, Irish Catholics and others; in the twentieth century, large numbers of Polish and African-Americans arrived in the state.

    Today, 42.6% of the population is of German ancestry, making Wisconsin one of the most German-American states in the United States, although there are many other major ethnic groups, including one of the larger Hmong populations in the nation. Various ethnic festivals are held throughout Wisconsin to celebrate its heritage.

    During the period of the Civil War, Wisconsin was a Republican and pro-Union stronghold. Ethno-religious issues in the late 19th century caused a brief split the Republican coalition. Through the first half of the 20th century, Wisconin's politics were dominated by Robert La Follette and his sons, originally of the Republican Party, but later of their own Progressive Party. Since 1945, the state has maintained a close balance between Republicans and Democrats. Major Republican figures include former Governor Tommy Thompson, while major Democrats include governor Jim Doyle and Senators Herb Kohl and Russ Feingold.[1]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisconsin

    and

    http://www.enchantedlearning.com/usa/states/wiscon...

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    how did wisconsin become a state?

    i am doining a state report and i got wisconsin.i need to find important monuments,and the main source of income of wisconsin and info about the resource.and how it became a state.do u know?do u know a website?

    Source(s): wisconsin state: https://biturl.im/pDiZC
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Here is how Wisconsin became a state:

    It was during the fourth session of the fourth legislative territorial assembly that preliminary steps were taken, which resulted in the formation of a State government. The first Tuesday in April, 1846, was the day fixed upon for the people to vote for or against the proposition. When taken it resulted in a large majority voting in favor of the measure. An act was passed providing for taking the census of the territory, and for the apportionment by the governor of delegates to form a State constitution, based upon the new enumeration. The delegates were to be elected on the first Monday in September, and the convention was to assemble on the first Monday in October, 1846. The constitution when formed was to be submitted to the vote of the people for adoption or rejection, as, at the close of the session, the terms of members of the council who had been elected for four years, and of the house, who had been elected for two years, all ended. The legislature re-organized the election districts, and conferred on the governor the power and duty of making an apportionment, based on the census to be taken, for the next Legislative Assembly, when, on the 3d of February, 1846, both houses adjourned sine die. The census taken in the following June showed a population for the territory of 155,217. Delegates having been elected to form a constitution for the proposed new State, met at Madison on the 5th day of October. After completing their labors, they adjourned. This event took place on the 16th of December, 1846. The constitution thus formed was submitted to a popular vote on the first Tuesday of April, 1847, and rejected. A special session of the legislature, to take action concerning the admission of Wisconsin into the Union began Oct. 18, 1847, and a law was passed for the holding of another convention to frame a constitution. Delegates to the new convention were elected on the last Monday of November, and that body met at Madison the 15th of December, 1847. A census of the territory was taken this year, which showed a population of 210,546. The result of the labors of the second constitutional convention was the formation of a constitution, which, being submitted to the people on the second Monday of March, 1848, was duly ratified. On the 29th of May, 1848, by act of Congress, Wisconsin became a State.

    As for all the other information you need - you can get it here:

    http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0108291.html

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    You must live their before entering college or else you will have to pay the 4/5 years in out of state tuition.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I said that I wanted a state named wisconsin and so thats how! JKJK search google. Pretty easy.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The Wisconsin area, bordered by the current-day states of Iowa, Minnesota, Michigan and Illinois, as well as Lakes Michigan and Superior, has been part of United States territory since the end of the American Revolution; the Wisconsin Territory (which included parts of other current states) was formed on July 3, 1836. Wisconsin ratified its constitution March 13, 1848 and was admitted to the Union on May 29, 1848 as the thirtieth state.

    In 1634, Frenchman Jean Nicolet became Wisconsin's first European explorer, landing at Red Banks, near modern-day Green Bay in search of a passage to the Orient. The French controlled the area until it was ceded to the British in 1763.

    After the American Revolutionary War, Wisconsin was part of the U.S. Northwest Territory. It was then governed as part of Indiana Territory, Illinois Territory, and Michigan Territory. Settlement began when the first two public land offices opened in 1834.[2] Wisconsin Territory was organized on July 3, 1836, and it became the 30th state on May 29, 1848.

    The state mineral is Galena, otherwise known as lead sulfide, which reflects Wisconsin's early mining history. Many town names such as Mineral Point recall a period in the 1820s, 1830s, and 1840s, when Wisconsin was an important mining state. When Indian treaties opened up southwest Wisconsin to settlement, thousands of miners — many of them immigrants from Cornwall, England — flocked to the "lead rush" in southeastern areas. Wisconsin produced more than half of the nation's lead; Belmont was briefly the state capital. By the 1840s, the easily accessible deposits were worked out, and experienced miners were drawn out of Wisconsin by the California Gold Rush. This period of mining before and during the early years of statehood directly led to the development of state's nickname, the "Badger State". Many miners and their families lived in the mines in which they worked until adequate above-ground shelters were built and were thus compared to badgers.

    In the 1830-60 period, large numbers of Yankees from New England and New York flocked to Wisconsin. Some became farmers but most settled in towns or cities where they set up businesses, factories, mills, banks, schools, libraries, colleges, and voluntary societies. They created many Congregational, Presbyterian and Methodist churches that still exist. The Yankees created the Republican party in 1854—the first local meeting in the country came in Ripon. They gave strong support to the Civil War effort, as well as to reforms such as abolition, woman suffrage and, especially, prohibition.

    Even larger numbers of Germans arrived, so that the state became over one-third German. Most became farmers, especially known for the dairy industry. Others moved to Milwaukee and smaller cities setting up breweries and becoming craftsmen, machinists and skilled workers who were in high demand as the state industrialized. The Germans were split along religious lines. Most Germans were Catholic or Lutheran, with some Lutherans forming the Wisconsin Synod and others joining the Missouri Synod. The Catholics and Lutherans created their own network of parochial schools, through grade 8. Smaller numbers of Germans were Methodists, Jews, or anticlerical liberals (especially intellectual refugees). Politically they tended toward the Democratic party, but 30-40% voted Republican. Whenever the Republicans seemed to support prohibition, they shifted somewhat toward the Democrats. When nativist Republicans led by governor William Hoard passed the Bennett Law in 1889 that would shut down German language schools, both Catholic and Lutheran, they revolted and helped elect the Democrats in 1890. In World War I, German culture came under heavy attack in Wisconsin. Senator LaFollette became their protector and Germans strongly supported his wing of the Republican party after that.

    Scandinavians comprised the third largest ethnic block, with Norwegians, Danes, Swedes and Finns becoming farmers and lumberjacks in the western and northern districts. A large Danish settlement in Racine gave the only large urban presence. The great majority were Lutheran, of various synods. The Scandinavians supported prohibition and voted Republican; in the early 20th century the were the backbone of the LaFollette movement. Irish Catholics came to Milwaukee and Madison and smaller cities as railroad workers. They quickly became prominent in local government and in the Democratic party. They wrestled with the German Catholics for control of the Catholic church in the state.

  • 1 decade ago

    havn't you ever heard of RESEARCHING?

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