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What are the chances my child will be diabetic?

I am not diabteic but the dad is he has type 1 diabetes. what are the odds? Is it inherited? Do both parents have to have the diabetic gene?

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  • Yahoo
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    There is a genetic profile for diabetes type 1. That doesn't mean that you or you child will always develop that disease though. It is encouraging to see that you are interested in this now.

    You can get a genetic profile of you and your child for about $1000.00 I know that sounds like a lot of money but it is a really great tool to have. After your report is ready you will meet with a genetic counselor who can explain the risk factors for you and your daughter and what can be done with diet and lifestyle to minimize the chances of those genes being activated.

    Best Wishes

    BTW my DSL is wonking up tonight, So just Google the words "genetic profile" and you can find a lab near you.

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  • 4 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Reverse Any Diabetes Easily - http://DiabetesCure.raiwi.com/?HXCu
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  • 1 decade ago

    Possible genetic risk factors

    Patients with type 2 diabetes are more likely than those with type 1 to know of a relative with diabetes and, therefore, to believe that diabetes runs in the family. To some extent, the appearance of "clustering" of type 2 diabetes in families arises because type 2 is so much more common than type 1 diabetes in the general population: It accounts for 90 to 95 percent of the estimated 18.2 million cases in the country today. Moreover, the occurrence of multiple cases in a family may reflect shared environmental risk factors, such as obesity and sedentary lifestyle.

    Genetics does, however, play an important part in determining who develops type 2 diabetes. Studies show that if one parent has the disease, children have a 7 to 14 percent chance of developing it. If both parents have type 2 diabetes, this increases to a 45 percent chance. If an identical twin has type 2 diabetes, there's a 58 to 75 percent chance that the other twin will develop it, too. By contrast, a person with no diabetes in the family has an 11 percent chance of developing type 2 diabetes by age 70.

    While type 2 diabetes may have a strong genetic basis in some patients, the development of the disease in most people is dependent upon the effects of such environmental and behavioral factors as obesity and a sedentary lifestyle or an underlying susceptibility that is poorly understood.

    Susceptibility to certain complications of diabetes also seems to be linked to genetics. However, careful blood glucose control is still an important mitigating factor.

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  • 4 years ago

    2

    Source(s): Amazing Diabetes Cure Secrets - http://DiabetesGoFar.com/?QiBg
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  • 1 decade ago

    "Genetics play a role in type 1 diabetes — but to a lesser degree than in type 2 diabetes. In general, a child has an increased risk of type 1 diabetes if a parent has the disease. But the risk is still low. Factors that influence this risk include:

    The sex of the parent with diabetes. The risk of type 1 diabetes in the general population is 1 percent to 2 percent. If your mother has type 1 diabetes, your risk is 2 percent to 4 percent. If your father has it, your risk is 6 percent to 8 percent.

    The age at which the parent developed diabetes. The younger the age, the greater the risk that the child will get the disease.

    Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common childhood diseases. It usually begins in puberty. Scientists have identified a gene mutation (SUMO-4) that, when present, increases the risk of this disease in children.

    Although you can't prevent type 1 diabetes, you can talk to your doctor about screening your child"

    Source(s):

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/diabete...

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  • 1 decade ago

    Diabetes is not caused by not eating right and not exercising, I am an insulin dependent diabetic with a 9 month old, when I was pregnant with my son my prenatal specialist explained to me that the diabetic chromosome is carried by the male and that there is a 3 to 5 % chance that the child will inherit it. You should talk to you doctors and express your concerns, they are the ones that can help you the best.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Diabetes does run in families. I'd ask the dad if any other family members have a history of diabetes. There may be a good chance.

    Source(s): Several members of my family have diabetes.
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  • 1 decade ago

    It will just depend on the make up of the child. They may or may not get that gene. I am a type 2 and I think (she won't admit if she is) that my mother may be. All of her relatives are. Both of her parents had diabetes. So far neither my brother or sister have become diabetic but they are just reaching the age where it might onset.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Beacause your dad has type 1 you have a smaller chance of getting it than you would if he were type 2. You also have to watch what you eat too because even if it isn't hereditary, you can still bring it on on your own. If both parents have diabetes then you have a huge chance of getting it and if anyone on either side have it then your chances increase. The more family members that have it, the greater you are of risk.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The mode of heritability is not known for diabetes yet. While it tends to run in families, how this happens is not known. It is recommended that if you have a first or second degree relative periodic screenings are a good idea. It is also important to know the symptoms of diabetes. You might want to discuss this with your child's pediatrician to get suggestions.

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