What wine glasses should I buy?

I am in the process of re-thinking our wine glass selection. Hubby and I like to drink wine and we have been using some pretty generic glasses thus far. I would like to have some glasses that are more geared towards the actual wine that will be served in them, something like restaurant quality. But, I am finding that there are a zillion different kinds of glasses I could buy (especially according to "Wine Enthusiast"). Which glasses do I really need? We usually drink shiraz, cab-sav, pinot noir and pinot grigio. I'd love it if I could get away with just two different kinds of glasses. Can I do that?

Update:

I am in the process of re-thinking our wine glass selection. Hubby and I like to drink wine and we have been using some pretty generic glasses thus far. I would like to have some glasses that are more geared towards the actual wine that will be served in them, something like restaurant quality. But, I am finding that there are a zillion different kinds of glasses I could buy (especially according to "Wine Enthusiast"). Which glasses do I really need? We usually drink shiraz, cab-sav, pinot noir and pinot grigio. I'd love it if I could get away with just two different kinds of glasses. Can I do that? I am a type of person who enjoys the wine, but also enjoys the presentation. I also want to be able to set a table with the right kind of glasses for various dinner parties. Suggestions?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    For those reds, you can use the same glass shape -- something with a wide, round bowl that tapers slightly to capture the aroma in the glass. The glass holding red wine in the first image in the Sources field would be a good choice.

    Whites (since you mention pinot grigio -- and if you enjoy it, try another Italian white called verdicchio) work fine in "red-wine" glasses, but are traditionally served in narrower glasses that taper to a point more rapidly than glasses for red wine. The theory there is that because whites are served chilled, they don't need the inward-curving bowl to capture the aroma; additionally, the narrower, more pointed base means there's less surface area for the wine to pick up warmth.

    In practice... a good medium-sized wine glass can work quite well for both red and white. The second illustration I included in the Sources field would make a great compromise wine glass.

    If I had to outfit a kitchen from scratch and was limited to two shapes, I'd get a full set of wine glasses like the "compromise" glasses, and then get a set of champagne flutes, because our wine consumption is roughly 70% red, 25% champagne, and 5% still white. Champagne really benefits from being served in flutes such as the third illustration in the Sources field; the narrow shape keeps its chill longer (as with whites), but even more so the reduced surface area at the top of the liquid helps retain the carbonation longer. So for our drinking preferences, champagne flutes would be a better use of money than traditional white-wine glasses. In your case, you might be better off buying a wide-bowled "red" and a narrower "white" of good quality; if you do serve champagne, you can get away with the "white" glasses quite well in a pinch.

    In practice, of course, we have a mix of about a dozen total wine glasses that are really the leftovers from several sets, mostly oriented towards red with a few multipurpose glasses in the mix, plus a mismatched quartet of champagne flutes. It's serviceable, but I'd love to update the selection.

    And on reflection... We have three or four left from a set of rugged, more rustic-feeling wine glasses that stand up to dishwashing very nicely, made with a heavier glass and thicker stems and not "optically perfect" in construction or finish. They're our favorite "everyday" wine glasses, in a shape halfway between red and white, usable for everything from a big Aussie shiraz to a crisp white. You might think about getting something like this, a more durable set with this rustic feeling, as your "vin ordinaire" glasses, and then get a set of Riedel crystal for special occasions. Worth a thought...

    Source(s): Traditional white and red wine glasses: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/alcoho... Good "compromise" wine glass: http://www.wineenthusiast.com/images/products/thum... Typical champagne flute: http://www.partytimerental.com/Showroom/Glassware/...
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  • 1 decade ago

    The best answer is the quality of the wine you drink if what you like hit above the 9 dollar range then you should get better quality glasses and stay away from restaurant grade as they are not much better then generic in most restaurants instead look for a nice thin lipped quality Chrystal which do need to be hand washed but there nothing better then sipping a quality wine out of quality glass this makes much more of a difference then the style of the glass so in truth I suggest getting the 2 more common styles that you like

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  • 1 decade ago

    I would buy a Riedel Cab/Merlot wine glass. Go to their website and check them out. A good all around glass.

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  • bama37
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    I have two sets of glasses, one set for red and one set for white. I don't drink champagne so I have no need for them. I don't have any blush glasses either I just use the white. works ok for me.

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  • ?
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Ever heard of Dixie cups?..multi colors......seems to well with any full bodied wine around 4.00 a bottle.....

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  • 1 decade ago

    Any wine expert will tell you that its the wine that's important, not the container.

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