If a child likes the subject a teacher teaches will they like that teacher more?

and if a teacher does learning activities and games will a child like them better?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yes! My two children have both had great teachers in subjects that they didn't like so therefore they did not see how great they were. On the opposite side, my daughter had a teacher in a subject she loved and excelled in it and thought the teacher was the best she ever had.

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  • Kiki
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    To some extent, yes on both questions. Students tend to not be able to separate the subject matter or the class from the teacher. If they've never done well in math, for instance, they tend to think "math sucks" and the teachers do so as well. (Not all students are like this, though. Some are able to realize their lack of interest in the subject does not necessarily mean everyone who teaches it sucks.) Most students do seem to enjoy games and the like. There will always be that student, though, who would rather just have a worksheet. They like order, sequential activities, etc. I teach English, and there are a few students who would rather do grammar problems (where there is a definite right or wrong answer) than do a debate or a role play. These students are usually the minority, though.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Oh, yes. No question about it. If student is intrigued with the subject the teacher will know it and that results in the teacher trying extra hard to develop the student's motivation to continue on in the field of study. It can also work the other way around, a teacher whom the student finds fascinating/likeable and responsive to him will create an interest in the subject. My three favorite teachers in high school were Ms. White (Play Production), Miss Bates (Algebra) and Miss Morrison (Latin). I was not good at Algebra but I worked my tail off because I liked Miss Bates so much. Best I could get in the two semesters were B's. In college I finally "got" it in advanced study. I still correspond with Miss Bates and have through the years. I will take her to lunch late next week.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Of course. Some of a teachers popularity relies on the subject, but a lot just relies on the teacher's style of teaching. Right now my least favorite class is Chemistry. The teacher doesn't have a teaching style I like (no games, lots of note taking, no bonus, no way to earn points for class participation, only way to get points is tests) and I personally just don't like Chemistry because it has nothing to do with any career field I would consider. However, one of my favorite classes is World History. I don't really like the subject because it's also not something I'd like to do for a career, but the teacher really makes it come alive and you have a lot of opportunites to earn points to improve your grade and just have fun. As a matter of fact, he said you could technically just barely fail every test he gives you and still pass the class.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes but it also depends on the personalities of the teacher and the child. However the Hawthorne effect usually happens a child who is getting extra positive attention generally likes the teacher who is giving him/her the attention , better.

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