Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Consumer ElectronicsOther - Electronics · 1 decade ago

Who invented the staple remover?

like whats his or her name or whatever?

3 Answers

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  • SCSA
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    A staple remover (or staple decleater) is a device that allows for the quick removal of a staple from a material without causing damage. Although a simple metal wedge can be used, this method tends to tear fragile papers. For light gauge staples, many people instead use a device consisting of two opposing wedges on a pivot. For convenience, this device has a spring that returns it to the open position after use.

    Proper use of the opposing wedge staple remover should also be noted. Staples should be removed via the flat, top side of the staple, not the back "curled" side of the staple. This can however often result in ripping of some paper, so some prefer to loosen the staple via the "curled" side before proceeding to the front flat side for easy removal.

    Some staplers, mainly small ones that are about 1.5 inches long contain an integrated staple remover. This is basically a piece of metal that is slid under each "curled" side of the staple and turned to loosen the staple.

    Also known as an aligator or staple puller.

    "Staple removers have existed in one form or another for almost a century. Early staple removers used a lever, as described above, inserted within the body of a larger device. The device served the purpose of both holding the stapled material in place and providing a means to apply firm and even pressure on the lever without requiring too great an expenditure of energy on the part of the user.

    A staple remover patented in the early 1920s, for example, used a sprung plunger to apply pressure. The device was placed over the staple with the curved, flattened prongs at one end of the main lever inserted beneath the flat back of the staple or crown. Pressing the plunger triggered a series of connections that raised the pronged end of the lever sharply, extracting the offending staple with a single swift movement. The prongs lifted the staple on either side, bending the back of the staple downwards and pulling the 'arms' upwards out of the stapled material."

    Jhonnie Berry invented this

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    A staple remover (or staple decleater) is a device that allows for the quick removal of a staple from a material without causing damage. Although a simple metal wedge can be used, this method tends to tear fragile papers. For light gauge staples, many people instead use a device consisting of two opposing wedges on a pivot. For convenience, this device has a spring that returns it to the open position after use. Proper use of the opposing wedge staple remover should also be noted. Staples should be removed via the flat, top side of the staple, not the back "curled" side of the staple. This can however often result in ripping of some paper, so some prefer to loosen the staple via the "curled" side before proceeding to the front flat side for easy removal. Some staplers, mainly small ones that are about 1.5 inches long contain an integrated staple remover. This is basically a piece of metal that is slid under each "curled" side of the staple and turned to loosen the staple. Also known as an aligator or staple puller. "Staple removers have existed in one form or another for almost a century. Early staple removers used a lever, as described above, inserted within the body of a larger device. The device served the purpose of both holding the stapled material in place and providing a means to apply firm and even pressure on the lever without requiring too great an expenditure of energy on the part of the user. A staple remover patented in the early 1920s, for example, used a sprung plunger to apply pressure. The device was placed over the staple with the curved, flattened prongs at one end of the main lever inserted beneath the flat back of the staple or crown. Pressing the plunger triggered a series of connections that raised the pronged end of the lever sharply, extracting the offending staple with a single swift movement. The prongs lifted the staple on either side, bending the back of the staple downwards and pulling the 'arms' upwards out of the stapled material." ""

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  • 1 decade ago

    Try goggling that.

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