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how do we know that most stars are made out of helium and hydrogen?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Scientist analyze the light from a star using a device called a spectrometer. Light from the elements passing thru the spectrometer make a certain pattern for that element. All the elements involved will combine together to make one big graph but it is easy to separate the patterns to determine which elements the light contains. therefore the star will be made of those elements. Most of the stars contain mostly hydrogen and helium

  • 5 years ago

    easily, each and every component you spot got here from a famous guy or woman (Hydrogen and Helium). only approximately each and every little thing you spot is made out of stardust. Even organisms like ourselves have been initially Hydrogen and Helium. the clarification we've distinctive factors on the instant, is thru nuclear fusion. Nuclear Fusion- the skill of multiple nuclei combine to make a heavier nucleus.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Stars may have been made out of anything and then have been converetd into helium and hydrogen by the extreme heat at their core.

  • Kes
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Hydrogen and helium are gaseous elements with electrons orbiting about them. When these gases are extremely hot they are ionized and stripped of their electrons. When electrons fall back into the atoms they give up excess energy in the form of photons traveling as light (at the speed of light!). The wavelengths of the photons are unique to the atoms because their orbital shells are different depending on the mass (protons and neutrons) of the atom's nucleus. Scientists can use spectroscopes (similar to powerful prisms) to separate the photons by their wavelengths (similar to separating colors) and compare results with known spectra from lab ttests. Helium (named after the sun!) was discovered in the sun by this method before it was discovered on earth (within gas deposits).

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    because the hottest stars are white and blue and are made of helium and hydrogen and the coolest stars are red and orange and are made of hyrdrogen and something else...im not sure

  • 1 decade ago

    We know this by analyzing the colors of light emitted by the star. Each element has its own spectra when we analyze the emitted light.

  • 1 decade ago

    We learned this through spectroscopy.

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