Why are neutron stars so incredibly dense???

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  • oracle
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    b/c there is no atomic structure there, only packed neutrons

    BTW, black hole is even more dense

  • 4 years ago

    Gravity from the well-loved individual is so large that it has actually knocked all electrons off of their respective atoms. without electrons to face up to one yet another the neutron well-loved individual (named via the indisputable fact that's made from completely neutrons) can compact a great volume. Electrons are in a cloud shifting insanely quickly around the nucleus yet truly that area is amazingly empty (truly) without this cloud you (that you will be able to imagine of because the nucleus being the solar and electrons as Mercury) there's a lot less area between nuetrons. Neutron Stars are between the densest gadgets in the universe, if its gravity were any more suitable it might want to develop right into a black hollow.

  • SAN
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    In short, gravity became so strong that it overcame the pressure supplied by degenerate electrons, resulting in a collapsing ball in which electrons and protons are jammed together to form neutrons and neutrinos. The star is then restrained from further collapse by neutron degeneracy pressure. The resulting density is similar to that of an atomic nucleus, since there are no longer any electron orbitals to take up volume.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Current understanding of the structure of neutron stars is defined by existing mathematical models, which of course are subject to revision. On the basis of current models, the matter at the surface of a neutron star is composed of ordinary atomic nuclei as well as electrons. The "atmosphere" of the star is roughly one meter thick, below which one encounters a solid "crust". Proceeding inward, one encounters nuclei with ever increasing numbers of neutrons; such nuclei would quickly decay on Earth, but are kept stable by tremendous pressures. Proceeding deeper, one comes to a point called neutron drip where free neutrons leak out of nuclei. In this region there are nuclei, free electrons, and free neutrons. The nuclei become smaller and smaller until the core is reached, by definition the point where they disappear altogether. The exact nature of the superdense matter in the core is still not well understood. While this theoretical substance is referred to as neutronium in science fiction and popular literature, the term "neutronium" is rarely used in scientific publications, due to ambiguity over its meaning. The term neutron-degenerate matter is sometimes used, though that term incorporates assumptions about the nature of neutron star core material. Neutron star core material could be a superfluid mixture of neutrons with a few protons and electrons, or it could incorporate high-energy particles like pions and kaons in addition to neutrons, or it could be composed of strange matter incorporating quarks heavier than up and down quarks, or it could be quark matter not bound into hadrons. (A compact star composed entirely of strange matter would be called a strange star.) However so far observations have neither indicated nor ruled out such exotic states of matter.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    A normal atom is a huge amount of empty space between the nucleus and the electron. If the nucleus were an orange, the electron would encompass as much space as a large church.

    In an electron star, there is none of this empty space, Just imagine how many oranges would completely fill and entire church?

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