what do the hospital color codes mean? Are they generally the same in every hospital?

for instance, in our local hospital I have heard the colors; pink, brown, gray, white, yellow, red, and of course, blue.

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  • 1 decade ago
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    It differs from hospital to hospital. What state are you in? I know for certain states it is different things also. If you say what state you are in I could try and find it according to state also.

    “Code Red” “Code Blue”, “Code Black”…people sometimes wonder what these terms mean if they happen to hear them used in a hospital (or more likely, hear them used on a TV series about doctors). The ABC TV series “Grey’s Anatomy” seems to have sparked a renewed interest in the topic of “Codes” in medicine with their 2006 episode entitled “Code Black”.

    Technically, there’s no formal definition for a “Code”, but doctors often use the term as slang for a cardiopulmonary arrest happening to a patient in a hospital or clinic, requiring a team of providers (sometimes called a “code team”) to rush to the specific location and begin immediate resuscitative efforts.

    Each hospital or clinic can decide how it wishes to manage and inform staff of potential emergencies. Many institutions use colors (e.g. “Code Red”, “Code Blue”) to identify specific types of emergencies. “Code Red” and “Code Blue” are both terms that are often used to refer to a cardiopulmonary arrest, but other types of emergencies (for example bomb threats, terrorist activity, child abductions, or mass casualties) may be given “Code” designations too. Colors, numbers, or other designations may follow a “Code” announcement to identify the type of emergency that is occurring.

    Some hospitals announce emergencies (“Codes”) over a public address system, while others just alert the necessary personnel via a pager system. Also, the use of the term “Code” to signify that an emergency is occurring is not limited to medical practice. Other institutions, such as office buildings, schools, or government facilities may use “Code” designations to alert personnel that an emergency is occurring.

    In summary, there are no standard definitions or conventions for the use of “Code” designations. While “Code blue” does refer to a cardiopulmonary arrest at many hospitals, it doesn’t necessarily mean the same thing everywhere. But even if you aren’t sure about the meaning of announcements you may hear, keep in mind that every hospital or institution has its own policies and conventions for notification of personnel in the event of emergencies, and the doctors and staff are trained to recognize and respond appropriately to these announcements."

    These are for Florida, but I think they are pretty common. They mean this for NJ too I'm almost positive..

    RED - Fire

    BLUE - Cardiac/Respiratory Arrest

    PINK - Infant/Child Abduction

    BLACK - Bomb

    ORANGE - Hazmat/Bioterrorism

    GREY - Violence/Security Alert

    WHITE - Hostage

    YELLOW - Lockdown

    GREEN - Mass Casualty/Disaster

    BROWN - Severe Weather

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  • jon
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Hospital Colour Codes

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  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    what do the hospital color codes mean? Are they generally the same in every hospital?

    for instance, in our local hospital I have heard the colors; pink, brown, gray, white, yellow, red, and of course, blue.

    Source(s): hospital color codes generally hospital: https://shortly.im/pWA3B
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  • 4 years ago

    I really don't know this one and I would like to know...I was in the hospital for about 5-6 weeks so I heard lotsa codes being called...

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  • Jessi
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    I know code black is a bomb threat, and code blue is someone is on the verge of death in some Indiana hospitals, but it all depends on what state you are in I think

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