Given bulbs, planted, growing great, but NO FLOWERS -- why?? They're in semi shade (Michigan), 2 ft. tall.

What promotes flowering? They're in a large pot, not in the ground. Can I bring them inside in winter --- will they continue to grow, or die back?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    What kind of bulbs are they?

    If they're spring flowering bulbs like crocus, daffodils, etc., they need to over winter and bloom only in the spring. They keep their foliage for a good long while so that they can gather energy from the sun for their bulb and bloom.

    If they're summer flowering bulbs, like canna lilys or day lilys, they probably should be blooming now in your summer season. Give them some liquid fertilizer like miracle gro and see if that helps them any.

    In any event, I think if you've got them in a pot, you should bring them inside during your long winters.'

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  • 1 decade ago

    You do not say what kind of bulbs but if they are 2 feet tall I am guessing they are a late blooming variety.... Giant Alium? Gladiola? Lily?

    When bought from a garden centre or grower you can be assured that the bulb WILL bloom, as it has been given all the right growing conditions to produce a flower.

    Bulbs do need to sleep / experience cold and dormancy. So yes, they will die back for the winter. If you want to keep them in the pot - and if you are in a cold climate - insulate the pot or place in a larger pot with peat moss as a filler to insulate.

    BTW after it blooms, do not cut the green growth off as this is busy making another flower for next year also, you should feed it with some granular bulb fertilizer ( high middle number) Trim off leaves when they begin to wither and brown.

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  • 1 decade ago

    First you have to tell us what kind of bulbs you planted! Some are hardy-able to stay in the ground all winter; others are tender and must be dug up and stored when temperatures drop. But, whether true bulb, corm,rhizome, tuber, or tuberous root, all produce flowers or lovely FOLIAGE year after year with a minimum of care. After the first season's bloom, future flowers depend on the care you give the bulbs.Leaves should not be cut off until they have ripened. With tulips, when the foliage is cut with the flowers or otherwise not allowed to ripen, the result is no bloom the following year. Bulbs treated this way often send up a single leaf but not flowers. Maybe that is what happened to your "second hand" bulbs.

    Source(s): BHG Complete Guide to Gardening Book
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  • 1 decade ago

    It really depends on the type of bulbs they are. Some bulbs need a cold winter in order to grow and bloom...others need to be planted in early spring to flower later in the year.

    Maybe your bulbs are small (immature) and not ready to flower yet. They might need another year for the bulb to become larger. They could also be in too deep of shade...or even planted too deep. If planted too deep, they will not flower properly.

    Really need to know the type of bulb/plant or at least a description of the plant to give more information.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    You have to tell us what kind of bulbs they are or give us a description of the foliage. If someone gave you amaryllis (an indoor plant) they should have bloomed by now outside, even in the shade.

    Were the bulbs in the pot when they were given to you or did you plant them in the pot?

    Foliage and bulbs or tubers:

    *Long, vibrant green, tropical-like, maybe 6-8 leaves per bulb, ends of leave rounded? Huge bulbs? Amaryllis.

    *Long, spikey, thin leaves, mostly upright, ends of leaves pointed? Smaller bulbs that are papery-like? Gladiolas.

    *Tropical-looking foliage with periodic white markings, leave not too big and upright? Bulbs not papery-like but firm, not too big? Calla lilies.

    *Huge, tobacco-like leaves, even on dwarf plants? Tubers rather than bulbs? Canna lilies.

    Amarylis should be allowed to die and dry down and brought in for the winter. Calla lilies usually do better in the sun and not in the shade and tend to rest during the heat of the summer. They should be dug up now and brought in. Cannas should also be dug up and brought in within a few weeks. Same with glad bulbs.

    You might have been given a potted bulb plant that had already bloomed for the giver -- like calla lilies.

    Source(s): Have grown all four plants described.
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  • Krispy
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    In my experience not all bulbs will flower the first year they are planted in new conditions. Another problem could be over crowding of the bulbs. Try to separate them and space about 2-6 inches apart to make sure that they get the needed nutrients, and are not fighting to stay alive.

    I would not recommend trying to keep them alive over the winter. Bulbs are supposed to hibernate during the cold. Allow them to die off and hibernate.

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  • 1 decade ago

    You can bring the plants inside for the winter and keep them in a well lighted area. Also, they need to be fertilized with Miracle Grow 15-30-15 to encourage blooms. Check to see what the light requirements are for the plants you are trying to grow. Most of these require full sun to partial sun and they like to be pot bound.

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  • 4 years ago

    I bet a lights going to come on there sometime soon....I believe your friend was referring to flower bulbs. Daffodils, hyacinths, crocuses, paperweights, irises and tulips are flowers that come out of bulbs. They also divide and multiply that way. They take a month or so to flower, some need a cold period to come up. Really good luck with your light bulbs. If they are Eco friendly you may get a path beaten to your door.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I think Bluealt gave you a very good answer. I was going to answer this question but you have received excellent and sincere answers from everyone who responded. Good luck and good growing. Just remember, it is not time for bulb plants to bloom yet. Look to early spring. I have some tulips in my refrigerator that I can hardly wait to plant. Groan.groan.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Depends on what sort of bulbs. Some summer flowering bulbs require a longer season that you probably have in the summer (like acidanthera).

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