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ld asked in Politics & GovernmentImmigration · 1 decade ago

deportation after a crime?

what is the opinion out there,?A 38 year old man born outside of the US, lived in the US for 35 years with a permanent resident green card, attended school in the US, worked LEGALLY in the US, paid taxes, married a US citizen and fathered US children has deported to Europe because he violated probation on a misdemeanor crime. His life continues, but he is in Europe and only wants to be reunited with his wife and children that he supports but has not seen in five years. In the last five years he has comitted no crime and has been gainfully employed, should he be allowed to return?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Based on the information you have provided I would say yes, he should be able to return.

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  • 1 decade ago

    He needs a good criminal law specialist that is also in tune with deportation laws. It's deplorable that someone makes a mistake and his entire family has to pay for that mistake. But where do we draw the line? How else does a person learn his lesson that being an American citizen is a privilege that should never be taken lightly. I will pray his family can get to see him wherever he is living clean now. As for being allowed to return is a matter for the judicial system with laws that have been imposed by our elected and chosen leaders of reputable knowledge in such cases and should be investigated individually not on this open public forum.

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  • If it is the law that he himself was not a citizen, then no. They make that law and enforce it to keep criminals from coming to this country to escape their own country's punishment, as well as making sure they don't add to the home grown criminals that we already have. You can't make an "exception", because there will always be the "well, he just. . .". Where does the line end? It is not possible to make a rule allowing certain ones in and not others. Making laws like that create loopholes. And we all know that loopholes get abused and circumvented. So if it means the difference between allowing an offender that has cleaned up his act to come back here or not allowing the habitual criminals to find a way around the law, I will choose keeping the law the way it is.

    I would think that if his wife really loves him, then she would move to him. I understand that it would be hard to uproot and move to another country, but if the man I love was made to leave this country and have to move to another, never to re-enter, then I would pack my bags and move with him.

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  • 1 decade ago

    If true yes he should be able to come back in. But your story has me a bit baffled. I've never heard of anyone on probation for a misdimeanor crime, much less deported. Sorry I just can't buy this story.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Anyone who is not a citizen can be deported for certain crimes. It's up to the court. And as another person stated, I think there's some information missing in your post.

    Pretty good information here:

    http://www.gandgbonds.com/Attorney_CourtUpdates.ht...

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I think that since he is a legal resident alien, he was treated much too severely. Why doesn't the government treat the ILLEGALS like this? You got me!

    One caveat, though...was he really convicted of a misdemeanor or was it a felony? If it was a felony, I think he was handled fairly.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    If he was married to a citizen after having a green card why ws he still not a citizen? You can't be telling the whole story here.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Well, according to your story, it seems as though you should be allowed to re-enter the US. But, how come you never became a US citizen if you were here for so many years?

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  • jaike
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    I hate sounding like a hypocritical blowhard......

    But the simple answer is: don't commit crime. Don't even test the waters of legality. Swallow your pride and live free without offending others.....

    ....because that is the key to never going to jail.....never break silence with everyone you deal with.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    talk to an immigration attorney, but from what i know he shouldn't have been deported for a misdemeanor...

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