promotion image of download ymail app
Promoted

How does the Armianist understand election?

Election is in the Bible. God's people are elected (chosen) by God. God does not choose people on the basis of good they do or anything good in them. Is choosing God a good thing? Then some are good and are chosen and some do not choose and are not chosen. This goes against the Bible, because God's choice is not based on the good people do. Yet, this is what the Armianists teach.

6 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I'll go along with that. I think you'll find that on YA the majority of Christian thought will be Arminianism. There are a few Calvinists, though, that look at their salvation in an entirely different light. I for one would never depend on man's ability to choose God. It would give too much credit to ourselves, and to me this is humanist arrogance that will not let God be God. He gave me the faith, and pulled me to Himself in spite of myself.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    They are called Arminians. The name comes from Jacob Arminius, who rejected the teachings of John Calvin. Thus Arminians believe that salvation is not predetermined, but dependent on the free will choice of the believer. God chooses Christ. And believers choose Christ and are "chosen in Him."

    Incidentally, the 5 Points of Calvinism are a response to Arminian teaching. They are not found in the writings of Calvin.

    Source(s): For a contemporary book on Arminian teaching see Elect in the Son. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Arminius
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The elect the chosen the faithful question. Well that is for people who have chosen to form a reciprocal relationship with God. Then they are God's chosen and elect and faithful.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    They believe that ALL people are chosen by God but we have free will to reject or accept that choosing...

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Mr. A
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    You're incorrect in your thoughts of Arminianism I believe. I actually can't make out what you're trying to say, but Arminianism is just the belief that human's choose God out of their own free will. God draws all men unto him, and then out of our free will, we choose him.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The majority Arminian view is that election is individual and based on God's foreknowledge of faith, but a second perspective deserves mention. These Arminians reject the concept of individual election entirely, preferring to understand the doctrine in corporate terms. According to this corporate election, God never chose individuals to elect to salvation, but rather He chose to elect the believing Church to salvation. Dutch Reformed theologian Herman Ridderbos says "[The certainty of salvation] does not rest on the fact that the church belongs to a certain "number", but that it belongs to Christ, from before the foundation of the world. Fixity does not lie in a hidden decree, therefore, but in corporate unity of the Church with Christ, whom it has come to know in the gospel and has learned to embrace in faith.

    Corporate election draws support from a similar concept of corporate election found in the Old Testament and Jewish law. Indeed most Biblical scholarship is in agreement that Judeo-Greco-Roman thought in the 1st century was opposite of the Western world's "individual first" mantra - it was very collectivist in nature. Identity stemmed from membership in a group more than individuality. According to Romans 9-11, supporters claim, Jewish election as the chosen people ceased with their national rejection of Jesus as Messiah. As a result of the new covenant, God's chosen people are now the corporate body of Christ, the church (sometimes called spiritual Israel - see also Covenant theology). Pastor and theologian Dr. Brian Abasciano claims "What Paul says about Jews, Gentiles, and Christians, whether of their place in God’s plan, or their election, or their salvation, or how they should think or behave, he says from a corporate perspective which views the group as primary and those he speaks about as embedded in the group. These individuals act as members of the group to which they belong, and what happens to them happens by virtue of their membership in the group."

    These scholars also maintain that Jesus was the only human ever elected and that individuals must be "in Christ" (Eph 1:3-4) through faith to be part of the elect. Joseph Dongell, professor at Asbury Theological Seminary, states "the most conscipuous feature of Ephesians 1:3-2:10 is the phrase 'in Christ', which occurs twelve times in Ephesians 1:3-4 alone...this means that Jesus Christ himself is the chosen one, the predestined one. Whenever one is incorporated into him by grace through faith, one comes to share in Jesus' special status as chosen of God. Markus Barth illustrates the inter-connectedness: "Election in Christ must be understood as the election of God's people. Only as members of that community do individuals share in the benefits of God's gracious choice.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.