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What is the origin of Finnish language?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    According to the traditional view of Finnish prehistory, ancestors of the Finns migrated westward and northward from their ancestral home in the Volga River basin during the second millennium B.C., arriving on the southern shore of the Baltic Sea some time during the next millennium. According to this folk history, the early Finns began a migration from present-day Estonia into Finland in the first century A.D. and settled along the northern coast of the Gulf of Finland. Recent research, suggesting that the Finns arrived in the region at a much earlier date, perhaps by 3,000 B.C., has questioned this traditional view, however (see fig. 2).

    Both the traditional and modern theories agree that in referring to this prehistoric age one should not speak of a Finnish people, but rather of Finnic tribes that established themselves in present-day southern Finland, gradually expanded along the coast and inland, and eventually merged with one another, absorbing the indigenous population. Among those tribes were the Suomalaiset, who inhabited southwestern Finland and from whom was derived Suomi, the Finnish word for Finland. The Tavastians, another Finnic tribe, lived inland in southern Finland; the Karelians lived farther east in the area of the present-day Karelian Isthmus and Lake Ladoga. On the southern coast of the Gulf of Finland were the Estonians, who spoke a Finno-Ugric language closely related to Finnish. North of the Finns were the Lapps (or Sami), who also spoke a Finno-Ugric language, but who resisted assimilation with the Finns.

    Prehistoric Finnic peoples reached the Iron Age level of development, with social organization at the tribal stage. These Finnic tribes were threatened increasingly by the politically more advanced Scandinavian peoples to the west and the Slavic peoples to the east.

    Sweden and Russia also had an impact on the Finnish language

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  • 1 decade ago

    Finnish originated from the branch of the Finno-Ugric subfamily of the Uralic family of languages that includes Finnish, Estonian, Lapp, Hungarian, Bulgarian and others spoken in northwestern Russia.

    Source(s): Webster's Collegiate Dictionary
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  • LVieau
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Finnish is a member of the Finno-Ugric language family and is classified as an agglutinative language. It modifies the forms of nouns, adjectives, pronouns, numerals and verbs depending on their roles in the sentence.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Without looking it up, I'll take a stab and say Russian.

    I should be ashamed of myself, because I am of Finnish descent, but our family has all been born here, great gramma having come over in 1900. Sadly, she died long before I was old enough to learn anything of our root language or country. She was so old. I remember I used to call her "Bushka" when I was little..........

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  • Taivo
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Judith11Center is right on the money and jdmacvieaux is a simple version. Ignore everyone else here who is just answering baloney in order to get two points

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Origin? Finnish! I get it!

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  • 1 decade ago

    The Country Of Finland.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I have no idea. I've only heard it spoken once and it sounds like Elvish to me (not to be disrespectful).

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