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Brown v. Board of Education ?

I understand that the outcome of the case ruled that segregation was unequal and unconstitutional but my question is, on what grounds was it unconstitutional? what law was it exactly breaking ?

Update:

I have read the constitution but i couldn't find what it was in violation of .

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  • 1 decade ago
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    The main issue of the case was the 14th amendment - and the fact that even though "seperate but equal" was the law - there was really no way to ensure there was an equality in education between the "black" schools and the "white" ones. A lower court had ruled that the schools were equal because they had the same number of buildings.

    The 14th amendment guarantees "equal protection under the law" which means that the laws of a state will apply to all citizens equally, without regard to things like skin color. The court found "the seperate but equal" law being used for segregated schools violated that provision of the amendment.

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  • 1 decade ago

    As other posters have mentioned, the law before Brown v. Board was that races could be segregated provided the facilities were equal. But in Brown v. Board, the Supreme Ct. ruled that separate was inherently unequal.

    The Supreme Court received a lot of criticism for its extensive reliance on social science data about how separate facilities made races feel inferior and thus made for poor performance in schools. While many people feel that the case was decided correctly, the Court's reasoning is a little "iffy" because of the volatility of social science data and the ability to manipulate results. While the Court's decision has consistently been followed, the reasoning has not.

    So while it was unconstitutional, the reasons are less important and have not been followed by other courts or even by the Supreme Court itself.

    Source(s): Constitutional Law II at SMU Dedman School of Law
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The last sentence of Sec 1 of the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution says that "No State . . . . shall deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws."

    The S. Ct. in Brown v. Bd. held that no matter what historical efforts the State of Kansas took to make segregated ***** schools equal in quality to white schools, it was unsuccessful because segregation itself treated students unequally and therefore segregation itself denied students equal protection of the laws.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The premise was seprate but equal. The fact of the matter is that just because it was seperate did not make it equal. School conditions were worst for Blacks in the Jim Crow south. So that is what made it unconstitutional.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The Supreme Court reversed its previous Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 U.S. 537 decision, which had upheld a state law requiring "separate but equal" segregated facilities for blacks and whites in railway cars, stating that "separate educational facilities are inherently unequal."

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  • 1 decade ago

    The Fourteenth Amendment of Constitution gives equal rights and equal protection to all citizens of the United States.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    in basis, there should be no discrimination because of race.

    School districts were suppose to be equal but were not. So those going to black districts were getting less chance at equal education.

    ( school districts between states may vary but this is because of location not race and education does not have to be equal under constitution from state to state but those within the same area must have the sames right to education from public schools.

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  • 1 decade ago

    A concept called the equal treatment clause. That all men are created equal. Get and read the Constitution.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It was about ending segregation in public schools.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Hmmm..I thought is was a reversal of an earlier ruling...Plessy v. Ferguson..."seperate but equal".

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