Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsMedicine · 1 decade ago

What causes hypnagogic hallucinations?

What makes one see things right as they wake up? Is this a leftover from one's dream, caused by not entirely waking up, or a different matter entirely?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Causes Of Hypnagogic Hallucinations

    There are several medical and psychiatric causes of hypnagogic hallucinations. Some of the common causes include the following:

    Sleep Deprivation And/Or Exhaustion

    Physical and emotional tiredness can induce hallucinations by blurring the line between sleep and wakefulness.

    Stress

    Prolonged or extreme stress can impede thought processes and trigger hallucinations.

    Meditation And/Or Sensory Deprivation

    When the brain lacks external stimulation to form perceptions, it may compensate by referencing the memory and form hallucinatory perceptions. This condition is commonly found in blind and deaf individuals.

    Electrical Or Neurochemical Activity In The Brain

    A hallucinatory sensation, usually involving touch called an aura, often appears before, and gives warning of, a migraine. Also, auras involving smell and touch (tactile) are known to warn of the onset of an epileptic attack.

    Drugs

    Hallucinogenics such as LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide, or acid), psilocybin (4-phosphoryloxy-N, N-dimethyltryptamine, or mushrooms), ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, or MDMA), and mescaline (3,4,5-trimethoxyphenethylamine, or peyote) trigger hallucinations.

    Other drugs such as marijuana and PCP have hallucinatory effects. Certain prescription medications may also cause hallucinations. In addition, drug withdrawal may persuade tactile and visual hallucinations, as in an alcoholic suffering from delirium tremens (DTs).

    Brain Damage Or Disease

    Lesions or injuries to the brain may change brain function and produce hallucinations.

    Mental illness

    Up to 75% of schizophrenic patients admitted for treatment report hallucinations

  • dana
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Hypnagogic Hallucinations

  • sarro
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Hypnopompic Hallucinations Causes

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

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  • 5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    What causes hypnagogic hallucinations?

    What makes one see things right as they wake up? Is this a leftover from one's dream, caused by not entirely waking up, or a different matter entirely?

    Source(s): hypnagogic hallucinations: https://shortly.im/HK2ws
  • 1 decade ago

    It's debatable - doctors would say it's just an elaborate hallucination. They'd say you're just getting some of the artifacts from dreams as you gradually come out of sleep.

    -

    However, some believe it's more than that - some feel hypnagogic hallucinations serve as the doorway to out of body experiences. (Naturally, a doctor will likely say an out of body experience is just another manifestation of the hallucination.)

    -

    Incidentally, Hypnagogic States happen while you're falling asleep. The paralysis/hallucinations that happen coming out of sleep are called Hypnopompic States.

  • 1 decade ago

    Hypnagogia (also spelled hypnogogia) are the experiences a person can go through in the hypnagogic (or hypnogogic) state, the period of falling asleep. Hypnopompia are the experiences a person can go through in the hypnopompic state, the period of waking up. The term hypnagogia often encompasses hypnopompia as well. Hypnagogic sensations collectively describe the vivid dream-like auditory, visual, or tactile sensations that can be experienced in a hypnagogic or hypnopompic state. These sensations can be accompanied by sleep paralysis, the sensation that the body is temporarily paralyzed after waking or before falling asleep.

    The term hypnagogic is derived from the French word hypnagogique, coined by the 19th century French psychologist Louis Ferdinand Alfred Maury from the Greek words hupnos, meaning sleep, and agogos, meaning leading. Frederic William Henry Myers coined the complementary term hypnopompic, from hupnos and pompe, meaning sending away.

    Hypnagogic sensations

    Hypnagogic sensations are vivid dream-like experiences that occur as one is falling asleep or waking up. Accompanying sleep paralysis can cause the sensations to be more frightening. The features of these sensations generally vary by individual, but some are more common to the experience than others:

    Most common

    Vividness

    Fear

    Falling sensation

    Common

    Sensing a "presence" (often malevolent)

    Pressure/weight on body (especially the chest).

    A sensation of not being able to breathe

    Impending sense of doom/death

    Fairly common

    Auditory sensations (often footsteps or indistinct voices, or pulsing noises). Auditory sensations which are described as noise instead of sensations of legible sounds, are often described to be similar to auditory sensations caused by Nitrous Oxide by persons who have experienced both.

    Visual sensations such as lights, people or shadows walking around the room

    Less common

    Floating sensations (sometimes associated with out-of-body experiences)

    Seamless transition into fully immersive lucid dreaming, also associated with out-of-body experiences

    Tactile sensations (such as a hand touching or grabbing)

    Rare

    Vibration

    Involuntary movements (sometimes the feeling of sliding off of the bed or even up walls).

    The feeling of being pulled in different directions

    During the hypnagogic state, an individual may appear to be fully awake, but still has brain waves indicating that the individual is still technically sleeping. Also, the individual may be completely aware of their state, which enables lucid dreamers to enter the dream state consciously directly from the waking state (see wake-initiated lucid dream technique). Many artists, musicians, architects, engineers, and others demanding creativity to be successful have benefited from hypnagogia, where the mind can be free and open to creative and new ideas.

    An experience of the hypnagogic state is not an uncommon occurrence with 30 to 40 percent of people experiencing it at least once in their lives. However, it could be a sign of a sleep disorder, such as narcolepsy and insomnia, or associated with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    The hypnagogic state can be accompanied by or associated with anomalous phenomena such as alien abduction, extra-sensory perception, telepathy, apparitions, or prophetic or crisis visions. This conduciveness to anomalous phenomena can be correlated with the initial increase of alpha and the later increase of theta brainwaves.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypnagogic_hallucinat...

    Hypnagogic hallucinations usually occur at the onset of sleep, either during daytime sleep episodes or at night. It is occasions of seeing and hearing things in sleep. These dreams can be frightening and can often cause a sudden jerk and arousal just before sleep onset.

    Hypnagogic hallucinations are dreams that break off on wakefulness, which can cause visual, auditory, or touchable sensations. They occur between waking and sleeping, usually at the onset of sleep, and can also occur about 30 seconds after a cataleptic attack.

    Hypnagogic hallucinations are a feature of narcolepsy. Sleep deprivation, medications, and irregular sleep schedules, all can predispose to happenings of this phenomenon.

    Causes Of Hypnagogic Hallucinations

    There are several medical and psychiatric causes of hypnagogic hallucinations. Some of the common causes include the following:

    Sleep Deprivation And/Or Exhaustion

    Physical and emotional tiredness can induce hallucinations by blurring the line between sleep and wakefulness.

    Stress

    Prolonged or extreme stress can impede thought processes and trigger hallucinations.

    Meditation And/Or Sensory Deprivation

    When the brain lacks external stimulation to form perceptions, it may compensate by referencing the memory and form hallucinatory perceptions. This condition is commonly found in blind and deaf individuals.

    Electrical Or Neurochemical Activity In The Brain

    A hallucinatory sensation, usually involving touch called an aura, often appears before, and gives warning of, a migraine. Also, auras involving smell and touch (tactile) are known to warn of the onset of an epileptic attack.

    Drugs

    Hallucinogenics such as LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide, or acid), psilocybin (4-phosphoryloxy-N, N-dimethyltryptamine, or mushrooms), ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, or MDMA), and mescaline (3,4,5-trimethoxyphenethylamine, or peyote) trigger hallucinations.

    Other drugs such as marijuana and PCP have hallucinatory effects. Certain prescription medications may also cause hallucinations. In addition, drug withdrawal may persuade tactile and visual hallucinations, as in an alcoholic suffering from delirium tremens (DTs).

    Brain Damage Or Disease

    Lesions or injuries to the brain may change brain function and produce hallucinations.

    Mental illness

    Up to 75% of schizophrenic patients admitted for treatment report hallucinations.

    Hypnagogic Hallucinations Treatments

    A quick medical evaluation should be sought, if someone starts to hallucinate and is disconnected from reality because many medical conditions that can cause hallucinations may quickly become emergencies. People who are hallucinating may become nervous, paranoid, and frightened and should not be left alone.

    With regard to the underlying disorder the hallucinations are treated. Depending on the disorder, treatment may involve anticonvulsant, antidepressant medications, or antipsychotic; brain or ear surgery; psychotherapy; or therapy for drug dependence.

    Hallucinations associated to normal sleeping and waking are not a cause for concern.

    A psychologist or psychiatrist should treat hallucinations that are symptomatic of a mental illness such as schizophrenia.

    Antipsychotic medication such as thioridazine (Mellaril), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), clozapine (Clozaril), haloperidol (Haldol), or risperidone (Risperdal) may be prescribed. In many cases, medications can control chronic hallucinations caused by schizophrenia or some other mental illness.

    Psychosocial therapy can be helpful in teaching the patient the coping skills to deal with them, if hallucinations persist. Hallucinations due to sleep deprivation or severe stress generally stop after the cause is removed.

    http://www.sleepdisordersguide.com/topics/hypnagog...

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