Resume question, explaining lack of long-term employment?

I'm a software developer, and have spent the past several years working in the not-very-stable videogame business. So, my resume includes a number of short stints at companies that were losing money in a big way. In videogames, this is normal, and no employer really cares if you've been at a lot of other firms. However, I've made up mind to get out of that field and do something different. Do I tell potential employers in other businesses that I wasn't fired from two recent companies on my resume, but that the companies had problems that led to my being let go? (Or in two other cases, that I chose not to extend a contract position to full employment?) Currently, I'm NOT explaining these issues on my resume.

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    You don't explain why you left jobs on your resume. When/if it comes up in the interview - then you explain the industry.

    Use a different format instead of chronological. You can lump your similar experiences together focusing on the experience and skills - not the short stints.

    Sites like monster and careerbuilder and college career centers usually have examples of the different formats.

    Source(s): Been teaching resumes and cover letters for 7 years
  • 1 decade ago

    Next two last sentence is a good answers, "most of the positions were contract positions that were not extended to full time positions." Most contract positions in the IT field are not extended because they are never intended to become full time. But do not explain on resume. Let them ask.

    Source(s): 15 years in computer IT support and security
  • 1 decade ago

    So you're getting serious now. Before, you went for jobs that looked like fun but now you're more interested in building a career. It's part of being creative and the right employer will understand that (unless it's been 20 years; then you're in worse shape).

    Gaps in employment are more af a problem for jobs involving military equipment; those customers don't like people with big gaps missing, especially if they have been out of the country. But if you're not looking to be "cleared", it's not a big deal.

  • 1 decade ago

    The most appropriate response is to be honest and educate others on the history of that type work. There was a time when people stayed on the job for a long time, but it is a thing of the past.

    Source(s): personal experience
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Dont lie, dont Exaggerate, Dont put anything related to issue on resume, go , make a good impression and give an honest answer when asked, all the best :)

    Source(s): some free sample resumes are available in my profile, check dem out, all the best :)
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I also had a similar problem. The answer for me was a company I found at:

    http://topfreedoms.com/

    They are honest, solid and helping scads of people worldwide to help themselves.

    I filled out their silly little 5 item form (no references asked) and now I'm on-board.

    They are not for everybody - but then what company is-it's a personal decision. Check 'em out.

  • 1 decade ago

    why not, instead of listing each job seperately, prepare your resume using a category approach and highlight how many years you have been a software developer (and then downplay the actual companies you have worked for)

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    This web site has a lot of resume information.

  • 1 decade ago

    LIE - exaggerate - whatever it takes

  • ed
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Can you say, "Reorganization"?

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